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Looking for Cessna Caravan pilots



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 31st 04, 01:42 AM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Looking for Cessna Caravan pilots

Hello,
My name is Kate and I'm a journalism student from Ryerson University.
I'm working on a story about how Cessna Caravans perform in icy
conditions. I'm interest in speaking to anyone that fly's this model (
208B). I would like to speak to you about how the de-icing process
works. And about your own experiences with icing. Please let me know
if you can be of any help. I can be reached at . To
those that may respond I would eventually like to speak to you over
the phone at some point. Thanks for your time. Any help will be
greatly appreciated.

Kate
Ads
  #3  
Old March 31st 04, 06:20 AM
Dude
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Posts: n/a
Default

At least she is asking pilots. Thats gotta qualify as research. Then
again, maybe they all do that stuff until they graduate and become "real"
journalists

Kate. I recommend calling the local FAA office and asking them if they know
any charter operations or air freight services using caravans you could
call. I am sure that you could get a pilot or two to talk to you if you
went down to their hangars.

Also, you will find that asking people who are smarter and wiser than you a
bunch of questions while trying to hide your agenda will not lead to
enlightenment or a Pulitzer. It WILL get you a dead end job in journalism.





"jsmith" wrote in message ...
Doing a story on the one that went down off Pelee Island, are you?

wrote:

Hello,
My name is Kate and I'm a journalism student from Ryerson University.
I'm working on a story about how Cessna Caravans perform in icy
conditions. I'm interest in speaking to anyone that fly's this model (
208B). I would like to speak to you about how the de-icing process
works. And about your own experiences with icing. Please let me know
if you can be of any help. I can be reached at
. To
those that may respond I would eventually like to speak to you over
the phone at some point. Thanks for your time. Any help will be
greatly appreciated.

Kate



  #5  
Old March 31st 04, 01:31 PM
Tom Sixkiller
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"MikeM" wrote in message
...
wrote:

Hello,
My name is Kate and I'm a journalism student from Ryerson University.


Sounds like shill for a plaintif's attorney to me


How do you figure that?


  #6  
Old March 31st 04, 04:18 PM
Mike Rapoport
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

That was my first thought too.

Mike
MU-2

"MikeM" wrote in message
...
wrote:

Hello,
My name is Kate and I'm a journalism student from Ryerson University.


Sounds like shill for a plaintif's attorney to me



  #7  
Old March 31st 04, 06:29 PM
xyzzy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Funny thing, mine too.

For one thing, most journalism students will have email addresses
attached to their university, not hotmail.

Does this put me into the category of oversuspicious people, or just
prudently cautious? Especially added to the fact that whenever a
stranger strikes up a conversation with me in a public place, I wonder
when he's going to start steering the conversation to Amway or some
other network marketing scam?

Mike Rapoport wrote:

That was my first thought too.

Mike
MU-2

"MikeM" wrote in message
...

wrote:


Hello,
My name is Kate and I'm a journalism student from Ryerson University.


Sounds like shill for a plaintif's attorney to me





  #8  
Old March 31st 04, 09:28 PM
S Green
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dude" wrote in message
...
At least she is asking pilots. Thats gotta qualify as research. Then
again, maybe they all do that stuff until they graduate and become "real"
journalists

Kate. I recommend calling the local FAA office and asking them if they

know
any charter operations or air freight services using caravans you could
call. I am sure that you could get a pilot or two to talk to you if you
went down to their hangars.


You are also likely to get more sense out of them than you will here too.


  #9  
Old April 1st 04, 12:25 AM
KG
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

wrote in message . com...
Hello,
My name is Kate and I'm a journalism student from Ryerson University.
I'm working on a story about how Cessna Caravans perform in icy
conditions. I'm interest in speaking to anyone that fly's this model (
208B). I would like to speak to you about how the de-icing process
works. And about your own experiences with icing. Please let me know
if you can be of any help. I can be reached at
. To
those that may respond I would eventually like to speak to you over
the phone at some point. Thanks for your time. Any help will be
greatly appreciated.

Kate



I'm not a Caravan pilot, but a friend of mine was. Here's how he
handled icy conditions. Is this what you're looking for? Of course
it's a little difficult to contact him now.

DEN03FA012
HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On November 8, 2002, at approximately 1020 mountain standard time, a
Cessna 208B, N514DB, operated by Brown County Financial Services, LLC,
of Snyder, Texas, was destroyed when it departed controlled flight and
impacted terrain approximately 3 miles south of Parks, Arizona. The
commercial pilot, a private pilot-rated passenger, and two other
passengers were fatally injured. Instrument meteorological conditions
prevailed. The personal cross-country flight was being conducted on an
instrument flight rules flight plan from Las Vegas, Nevada, to
Midland, Texas, under the provisions of Title 14 CFR Part 91. The
flight originated at 0819 Pacific standard time.

At 0844, the pilot contacted the Fort Worth, Texas, Automated Flight
Service Station (FTW FSS) to file an instrument flight rules flight
plan. The pilot told the briefer that he planned to depart Las Vegas
at 0900 and cruise at 12,000 feet. The route of flight was planned to
proceed via Peach Springs, Flagstaff, and Winslow, Arizona; Zuni,
Albuquerque, Corona, and Roswell/Chisum, New Mexico, and end at
Midland, Texas. The pilot told the briefer he planned for 4 hours en
route, with 6 hours of fuel on board. The pilot provided contact
information and told the briefer there were four persons aboard.

As the briefer was entering the flight plan, he asked the pilot if he
got his weather. The pilot replied, "just a second ago." The pilot
then asked about an airman's meteorological advisory (AIRMET) for
icing. The briefer told the pilot an AIRMET was in effect for the
pilot's route of flight, that included moderate mixed and rime icing
from the freezing level up to 24,000 feet. The briefer added that the
freezing level was forecast to be at 12,500 feet in Arizona and that
it was dropping down to 10,500 feet further east. The briefer also
gave the pilot advisories for scattered rain cells in New Mexico. The
briefer advised the pilot of a significant meteorological advisory
(SIGMET) for severe turbulence north of the his planned route, but
cautioned that he may experience some turbulence as well. The pilot
stated he was expecting it.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the airplane
departed Las Vegas, Nevada, at approximately 0919. The pilot received
routine clearances, via his planned route, and climbed to a cruising
altitude of 13,000 feet. At 1005, the pilot contacted ZAB and reported
that he was level at 13,000 feet. At 1009, the pilot requested a climb
to 15,000 feet. The ZAB controller approved the request.

At 1013:55, the pilot contacted the Albuquerque Automated Flight
Service Station (ABQ FSS). The pilot reported to the Flight Watch (FW)
specialist that he was approximately 23 miles west of Flagstaff at
15,000 feet, and that about 20 miles west of his position, at 13,000
feet, he encountered light mixed icing. The pilot requested any pilot
reports (PIREP) from the FW specialist. FW reported that the only
PIREP for icing that he had was from an airplane climbing out of
Albuquerque (ABQ) westbound, who reported a trace of rime icing at
12,000. The pilot acknowledged and asked about the weather across New
Mexico. FW advised the pilot to stand by while he gathered the
reports.

At 1015:15, the pilot called ZAB and reported
"getting...mixed...right...now, ."The pilot requested to climb to
17,000 feet. The transmission was partially blocked by other aircraft.
At 1015:45, the pilot repeated the altitude request. At 1015:57, the
controller cleared the airplane to 17,000 feet. The pilot
acknowledged.

During the conversation between the pilot and ZAB, the FW specialist
transmitted the weather reports for northern New Mexico and western
Texas, advising that light rain was reported at Gallup, New Mexico,
layered clouds near Roswell, New Mexico, and good VFR weather near
Midland, Texas. At 1016:35, the FW specialist repeated the report of
trace icing near ABQ and concluded the report with "mostly just
aircraft getting light chop, over." The pilot did not reply.

At the same time ABQ FSS was sending the weather reports, ARTCC radar
showed the airplane climb to 15,200 feet, then rapidly descend.

At 1017:00, the FW specialist advised the pilot to "check back when
you get a chance, Flagstaff altimeter 30.11." At 1017:08, ABQ FSS
received a broken transmission, "four delta bravo." The FW specialist
said, "you[r transmission] broke up." There were no further
transmissions from the airplane. Radar contact with the airplane was
lost at 1017:20.

At 1019, the ZAB controller attempted contact N514DB with no results.
The controller then requested another aircraft to monitor for an
emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signal. No signal was identified.

A retired airline pilot who was near the accident site, said he heard
engine noises that sounded similar to an airplane doing "aerobatics."
Shortly thereafter, he saw the airplane emerge from the clouds pointed
straight down and in a spin. The airplane disappeared behind trees.
The witness said he heard it impact the ground.

A second witness, who was flying an air ambulance Cessna 208 in the
vicinity, said he heard N514DB ask Albuquerque Air Route Traffic
Control Center (ZAB) for clearance to 17,000 feet because he was
"getting mixed ice." The witness stated that the person making the
radio call from N514DB sounded "stressed," and that the transmissions
were "garbled."

A third witness, a mechanic on the air ambulance Cessna 208, stated
that he heard N514DB report that they were "getting ice." The witness
said that the "pilot sounded scared." The witness also said that his
pilot told him "the Cessna 208 is very susceptible to icing."

The airplane wreckage was located at approximately 1030.


PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the pilot held a commercial pilot
certificate with airplane single-engine land, and multiengine land
ratings, dated August 28, 2000. The pilot also held a flight
instructor certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating,
dated July 23, 2000.

The pilot held a first class airman medical certificate, dated January
7, 2002, with the limitation: "Holder must wear lenses that correct
for distant vision."

According to the pilot's flight logbook, as of October 10, 2002, he
had logged a total flight time of 1,880.2 hours in all aircraft,
1,187.1 hours as pilot-in-command, 428.7 hours as a flight instructor,
125.0 hours of actual instrument (3.0 hours in the last 30 days), and
76.9 hours in make and model (6.9 hours in the last 30 days). From
June 24, 2002, to June 28, 2002, the pilot attended Flight Safety
International, for Cessna 208 training. The pilot received 7.5 hours
of simulator time, which included a 1.5 hour flight review on June 28,
2002. The last logbook entry, dated October 10, 2002, was a local
flight lasting 3.7 hours. As of that date, the pilot had accumulated
87.0, 73.5, and 6.9 hours in the last 90, 60, and 30 days,
respectively. An accurate account of flight time from October 10,
2002, to the date of the accident, was not determined.

According to FAA records, the pilot-rated passenger held a private
pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating, dated
November 22, 1987. He also held a third class airman medical
certificate, dated April 8, 2002, with the limitation: "Holder shall
wear corrective lenses."

According to pilot records, from June 24, 2002, to June 28, 2002, the
pilot rated passenger attended Flight Safety International, for Cessna
208 training. He received 7.5 hours of simulator time. As of July 31,
2002, the pilot-rated passenger had accumulated a total flight time of
650.0 hours in all aircraft.


AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a Cessna model 208B Caravan (S/N 208B0971).
The airplane was manufactured in July 2002 and delivered to the owner
on August 1, 2002. The airplane was used for business and pleasure.
The airplane was equipped with a Pratt & Whitney Canada, Inc., model
PT6A-114A free turbine engine, (S/N PCE-PC0984), rated at 675
horsepower. The engine was equipped with a McCauley three-bladed
propeller (S/N 020389), with blade serial numbers WB30005, WB30007,
and WB30022. According to the manufacturer, the airplane accumulated
2.2 hours of flight time prior to delivery.

A custom interior was installed in the airplane on August 16, 2002.
The airplane's calculated empty weight at that time was 5,531.00
pounds. Total airplane time was not determined. However, the pilot's
logbook showed he had logged 76.9 hours in the airplane.


METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0956, the reported weather conditions at Flagstaff Pulliam Airport,
Flagstaff, Arizona (located approximately 16 nautical miles at 110
degrees from the accident site) we wind, 230 degrees at 22 knots,
gusting to 27 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition,
broken at 3,300 feet, overcast at 4,400 feet; temperature 43 degrees
Fahrenheit (F), dew point 27 degrees F, and an altimeter setting, of
30.11.

At 1056, the reported weather conditions we winds 230 degrees at 21
knots, gusting to 27 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition
scattered at 4,100 feet; temperature 43 degrees F; dew point 27
degrees F; and an altimeter setting of 30.10.

Pilots flying aircraft in the vicinity of Grand Canyon, Flagstaff, and
Prescott, Arizona, reported broken and overcast skies with light rime
to moderate rime icing between 7,500 feet and 17,000.

According to the National Weather Service, in-flight weather
advisories for occasional moderate icing and occasional moderate
turbulence were in effect for the accident area.


WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The National Transportation Safety Board on-scene investigation began
on November 9, 2002, at 0805. The accident site was located in a
wooded area immediately west of the north-south running asphalt
covered forest service road (FS road 141), approximately 3 nautical
miles south of Parks, Arizona. The accident site was on state forest
land and the main impact point was located at a latitude and longitude
of 35 degrees 13.511 minutes north, and 111 degrees 55.920 minutes
west. An odor of aviation fuel was present at the impact point and
proceeded approximately 160 feet along a 068-degree magnetic heading,
across the road, and into a wooded area on the east side of the road.
The impact point was located within a stand of three Ponderosa pine
trees approximately 130 feet west of the asphalt road. The three pine
trees formed a line, primarily northwest to southeast. There were no
signs of a post-impact fire.

The southeastern-most tree, located 22 feet from the center tree, had
a gash on its trunk approximately 14 feet up from the base. There was
a 10-inch wide gash on the west side of the standing trunk, beginning
approximately 18 inches below the fracture and extending downward
approximately 3 feet in length. The top section of the tree was
located approximately 5 feet east of the tree's base. The center tree
showed numerous fractured branches. Many broken tree branches were
located at its base. The south side of the center tree's trunk showed
numerous gashes beginning approximately 14 feet up from its base and
running downward to the ground. The northwestern-most tree in the
stand was located approximately 14 feet from the center tree. It was
broken approximately 10 feet up from its base. A 4-foot section of the
tree's trunk and bark on the tree's east side was broken downward.
Numerous broken tree branches were found in the vicinity of the tree.
Several pieces of chopped tree branches were also located in the area
between the tree and the center tree in the stand.

An impact crater was located at the base of the center tree. The
impact crater was approximately 37 inches long, 18 inches wide, and 24
inches at its deepest point. A mound of soil was pushed upward at the
north edge of the crater. The lip was approximately 8 inches high. A
ground scar ran from the base of the center tree and lip of the impact
crater toward the southeastern-most tree in the stand. The ground scar
was approximately 7 feet long, 4 feet wide, and 5 inches at its
deepest point, which was near the crater.

The majority of the airplane's main wreckage was located on the north
side of the center tree. The airplane wreckage rested predominantly
upright and was oriented on a 065-degree magnetic heading. The
airplane's engine and propeller hub rested in the impact crater. The
engine was oriented on a 065-degree magnetic heading. The propeller
hub was buried in the north wall of the crater at a 60-degree downward
angle. The propeller hub was broken open. Two of the three propeller
blades were broken out at the cuffs. The propeller piston protruded
through the front of the hub cylinder. The propeller blade that
remained with the hub showed torsional bending, chord wise scratches
across the chambered surface, and several nicks along the leading
edge.

The airplane's cowling and forward fuselage was broken aft and
fragmented to fuselage station (FS) 128.00. The airplane's engine
mounts were broken aft and twisted counter-clockwise and outward. The
firewall was broken out and bent forward about the aft section of the
engine. The nose gear was bent and broken rearward. The wheel hub and
tire remained intact. The front windscreen was broken out and
fragmented. The glare shield was broken outward and fragmented. The
instrument panel was broken aft and fragmented. Flight and engine
instruments, radios, and control yokes were broken out. Numerous
warning lights, instruments, and radios were located in and around the
north side of the impact crater.

The airplane's cabin and baggage compartment were broken aft and
opened from FS 154.00 to approximately FS 385.60. The cabin section
pieces rested in the vicinity of the impact crater along its northeast
edge. The left front seat remained with the cockpit wreckage. The
right front seat and six passenger seats were separated from the cabin
floor. All of the cabin windows were broken out and fragmented. The
cabin window frames were bent aft and twisted outward. The bottom of
the center fuselage section along with the cabin floor was split open
along the airplane's keel. The cabin's interior walls and ceiling were
broken aft and fragmented.

The cargo pod, beginning at FS 100.00 and running aft to FS 370.80,
was broken out, crushed rearward, and fragmented. Sections of the
cargo pod were located south of the two center trees. The main landing
gear legs were broken aft.

The airplane's left wing was crushed rearward beginning at the root
and running outward across its entire span. The inboard section of the
wing, starting at wing station (WS) 33.50 and proceeding outward to WS
141.20, and the inboard portion of the left flap were crushed aft and
broken open. The outer portion of the left flap was broken outward
from the flap tracks and crushed aft. The center portion of the left
wing from WS 141.20 to WS 228.50 was crushed aft, broken open and
fragmented. The left wing was broken open and crushed aft. The smell
of aviation fuel was present. The left wing strut was broken out at
the wing attachment bolt. The outboard section of the left wing was
crushed aft and broken open. The left wing tip was broken
longitudinally and fragmented. The left aileron was broken out at the
hinges.

The airplane's right wing was broken aft at the wing root (WS 35.00)
and crushed aft and upward across its entire span. The leading edge
was broken open from the root to WS 214.30. The forward spar and right
wing strut were broken out. The bottom attachment fitting for the
right wing strut remained attached at the fuselage. The right wing was
broken open and crushed aft. The smell of aviation fuel was present.
The outboard section of the right wing, beginning at WS 244.48, was
flattened. The right wing tip was separated longitudinally from the
wing. The right aileron was broken outward, crushed inward and
buckled. The aileron was folded over onto the outer top surface of the
right flap. The right flap was in the retracted position. The flap
surface was buckled and bent aft.

The airplane's aft fuselage and empennage were bent upward and broken
circumferentially starting at FS 384.85. The empennage rested inverted
on top of the airplane's engine. The fin leading to the vertical
stabilizer was broken outward, crushed, and fragmented. The vertical
stabilizer and rudder were crushed aft and bent approximately 30
degrees to the right. The right horizontal stabilizer and right
elevator were crushed aft and broken near stabilizer station (SS)
80.60. The left horizontal stabilizer and rudder were crushed aft and
bent upward approximately 30-degrees at SS 67.80. A 15-foot section of
tree trunk, which resembled the top portion of the northwestern-most
tree in the stand of three trees, rested on top of the empennage.

Both main landing gear wheels were broken aft at the bottom portions
of the gear legs. The airplane's left main wheel, brake, and tire were
located 327 feet north-northeast of the airplane main wreckage. The
right main wheel, brake, and tire were located 225 feet
south-southeast of the airplane main wreckage. Pieces of the
airplane's battery were located on the east side of the asphalt road
beginning approximately 170 feet from the airplane main wreckage and
running along a 068-degree magnetic heading.

A debris field surrounded the airplane main wreckage and extended
outward from the wreckage for approximately 90 to 100 feet in all
directions. The debris field encompassed fragmented pieces of clear
Plexiglas, white-colored paint chips, small metal pieces, pieces of
chopped branches, pieces of cabin interior, instrument components,
aeronautical charts, personal effects, and two propeller blades. Many
of the pieces of chopped branches showed 45 to 60-degree angular cuts.
The two propeller blades showed torsional and aft bending, chord wise
scratches, and nicks along the leading edges. A gyro case from the
airplane's attitude indicator was examined and showed rotational
scoring on its inside wall.

The following instruments were examined at the accident site and
showed the following readings:

Altimeter: 6,580 feet
Kollsman window setting: 30.10
Magnetic compass: Functional

The following instruments and components were located and found
destroyed:

Heading situation indicator
Artificial horizon
Course indicator
Autopilot
Annunciator panel
Airspeed Indicator

An examination of the airplane's systems showed no pre-impact
anomalies.

The following components were examined at the accident site and showed
the following readings. These items were secured and retained for
further testing and examination:

Inter-Turbine Temperature (ITT) indicator: 820 degrees
Propeller Tachometer indicator: 1,620 RPM
Engine Tachometer Percent RPM (Ng) indicator: 66.5 percent
De-ice Valve assembly: impact damaged
PT6A-114A engine: impact damaged
Turn Coordinator: impact damaged
Directional Gyro: impact damaged
Fuel Flow indicator: impact damaged
Torque indicator: impact damaged
Oil Temperature indicator: impact damaged
Auto Pilot (mode) Annunciator: impact damaged


MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Coconino County Medical Examiner conducted an autopsy on the pilot
on November 9, 2002, at Flagstaff, Arizona.

FAA toxicology of samples taken from the pilot were negative for all
tests conducted.


TESTS AND RESEARCH

On February 20, 2003, the Inter-Turbine Temperature (ITT) (S/N
02E275D), Propeller Tachometer (S/N 02B199), and Engine Tachometer
Percent RPM (Ng) (S/N 02E41) indicators were examined and tested in
Wichita, Kansas. The ITT indicator was damaged such that it could not
provide reliable data. Testing of the Propeller Tachometer showed that
all evaluated factors met the indicator's calibration requirements.
The Engine Tachometer Percent RPM (Ng) indicator showed that all
evaluated factors were within the min/max input range, which met the
indicators calibration requirements.

On April 4, 2003, the De-Ice System valves were examined at the Cessna
Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas. According to a laboratory engineer,
the three de-ice valves, (S/N N19,550, N19,553, and N19,560) showed no
significant external damage. The examination of the valves showed no
external pre-impact anomalies that could have precluded their proper
operation in flight.

The airplane's engine was examined at the Pratt & Whitney Canada,
Service Investigation Facility, St. Hubert, Quebec, Canada, on April
15, 2003. The examination showed contact signatures to the engine's
internal components characteristic of the engine developing
significant power at the time of impact. The engine displayed no
anomalies that would have precluded normal operation prior to impact.
See attached extract from the Pratt & Whitney Canada report 02-090.

On June 19, 2003, the Turn Coordinator (S/N 64175), Directional Gyro
(S/N 2205-16), Fuel Flow indicator (S/N 0217-XXX, last three digits
unreadable), Torque indicator (S/N E22594), Oil Temperature (S/N
E22222), and Auto Pilot (mode) Annunciator (S/N 1626) were examined at
the NTSB's Office of Research and Engineering Materials Laboratory in
Washington D.C.

The Directional Gyro was disassembled and the gyroscope rotor and
housing were examined. In several locations, the purple surface
coating on the gyroscope rotor had been completely rubbed though. The
gyroscope housing showed several purple colored rotational marks on
its side. The Turn Coordinator was disassembled and one continuous
score mark was found on the gyroscope rotor. The score mark
corresponded to the location of a deformation in the gyroscope
housing. No needle transfer marks were found on the faceplates of the
Fuel Flow indicator, Torque indicator, and Oil Temperature indicator.
The Auto Pilot (mode) Annunciator light labeled TRIM displayed
significant stretching and deformation to the filament consistent with
a hot impact. However, none of the other lights showed evidence of hot
stretching or severe relaxation of the filament coils.

According to Honeywell/Bendix, the manufacturer of the Auto Pilot
(mode) Annunciator, the trim light on the annunciator (or the Trim
Fail Light) is controlled directly by the hardware trim runaway
monitor. The monitor is exercised and checked during the pre-flight
test (PFT), and also runs continuously during normal operation. The
monitor ensures that: (1) when pitch clutch is engaged for auto-trim,
the motor is running in the same direction as the strain gauges are
sensing; (2) when pitch clutch is engaged for manual trim, the motor
is running in the same direction as the switches are commanding and;
(3) that in reference to the strain gauge themselves, the two inputs
must have proper polarities and values comparing to strain gauge
reference, and the reference itself is valid. Any of the above three
conditions can turn the trim light on during normal operation. Once
the trim light comes on it "latches" and will only reset during a
power cycle where PFT is run.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

According to the Cessna Model 208B pilot's operating handbook (POH),
Supplement S1, "Known Icing Equipment," under Section 2 , Limitations,
it states the "maximum weight for flight into known icing with cargo
pod installed is 8,550 pounds." Under Section 3, Emergency Procedures,
"Inadvertent Icing Encounter at Weights Above 8,550 pounds (with cargo
pod installed), it states "4. Turn back or change altitude to leave
icing conditions as soon as possible."

The aircraft was not equipped with a factory installed cargo pod
de-ice boot.

According to Cessna's calculated performance data (using the actual
occupant and cargo weights and the current weight and balance of the
airplane), the airplane's take-off weight was 8,723 pounds.

Parties to the investigation were the FAA Flight Standards District
Office, Scottsdale, Arizona, the Cessna Aircraft Company, and Pratt &
Whitney, Canada.

The airplane wreckage was released to the owner's representative on
September 11, 2003.
  #10  
Old April 1st 04, 02:54 AM
Dude
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Would you tell your daughter to put her actual email address on usenet?

Especially an email address that, like most university addresses, can easily
be tracked back to the actual person?


"xyzzy" wrote in message
...
Funny thing, mine too.

For one thing, most journalism students will have email addresses
attached to their university, not hotmail.

Does this put me into the category of oversuspicious people, or just
prudently cautious? Especially added to the fact that whenever a
stranger strikes up a conversation with me in a public place, I wonder
when he's going to start steering the conversation to Amway or some
other network marketing scam?

Mike Rapoport wrote:

That was my first thought too.

Mike
MU-2

"MikeM" wrote in message
...

wrote:


Hello,
My name is Kate and I'm a journalism student from Ryerson University.

Sounds like shill for a plaintif's attorney to me







 




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