A aviation & planes forum. AviationBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AviationBanter forum » rec.aviation newsgroups » Aerobatics
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Aircraft suitable for zero g flight



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 20th 05, 11:41 AM
David Findlay
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Aircraft suitable for zero g flight

I'm interested in learning to do a zero g manueveur as part of my aerobatics
training. I get the idea that this would require certain characteristics
from the fuel system, i.e. the fuel still needs to flow into the engine in
zero g. Will a standard fuel pump system as provided in aerobatic aircraft
be capable of handling this? Liquids in zero g have a tendancy to form
spherical bubbles that just float around, although surface tension still
works.

As for method of doing it, I would expect the best method is the old NASA
method of hanging a small weight from the compass, if the weight goes down
push forward, if the weight goes up pull back. Anyone done it? Thanks,

David
Ads
  #2  
Old July 20th 05, 08:20 PM
ShawnD2112
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

David,
Depending on what you want to do, you may be thinking about this too hard.

How long do you want to be weightless? Zero G is accomplished by flying a
downward parabola, so it eats up altitude. Unless you're going to start at
10000 ft AGL, you're not going to have a great deal of time in zero G in any
case.

I do zero G maneuvers in a Taylorcraft all the time, for probably about 5-8
seconds at a time. Wouldn't bother hanging anything from the compass. Put
an object (logbook works fine) on the dashboard. Push over until it floats
up off the dashboard. Level off, climb back up, repeat. Great Fun!

Shawn

"David Findlay" wrote in message
...
I'm interested in learning to do a zero g manueveur as part of my
aerobatics
training. I get the idea that this would require certain characteristics
from the fuel system, i.e. the fuel still needs to flow into the engine in
zero g. Will a standard fuel pump system as provided in aerobatic aircraft
be capable of handling this? Liquids in zero g have a tendancy to form
spherical bubbles that just float around, although surface tension still
works.

As for method of doing it, I would expect the best method is the old NASA
method of hanging a small weight from the compass, if the weight goes down
push forward, if the weight goes up pull back. Anyone done it? Thanks,

David



  #3  
Old July 23rd 05, 02:43 PM
Peter H. Schmidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


You can reduce altitude loss by pitching up at the beginning of the
maneuver. In the Pitts, I pitch up to about 50 degrees above level,
establish a climb briefly, and then push the stick forward until the G
meter shows 0 and ride it to 45 dgerees nose low or so, then pull to
recover. I picture the arc of a lobbed baseball, and try to fly that.

While zero G is within the G envelope of every aircraft, the risk with
this maneuver is the nose-low attitude at the end. Airspeed will
build, and could cause overstress on the recovery if not managed
properly. And there is also the issue that non-aerobatic aircraft may
not have fuel and oil systems that tolerate zero G well.

Less of an issue with acro aircraft, but they still may experience oil
starvation from what I have been told. The ball valves in a Christen
inverted system, for example, won't be pulled all the way to either
end, and one rule of thumb I've read is to spend 10s or less at 0 G,
at knife edge, or on a vertical line.

ObDisclaimer: Try it with an instructor first. Don't exceed Vne,
Don't pull the wings off. Don't ruin your engine. I am not a flight
instructor, and this is not flight instruction!

Regards -- Peter
--
Peter H. Schmidt `\ /' Burning Blue Aviation Inc.
------^------ 2 Ewell Avenue
www.burning-blue.com | |o| | Lexington, MA 02421
fax: 781 863-8858 ------v------ tel: 781 883-4818
|
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
AOPA Stall/Spin Study -- Stowell's Review (8,000 words) Rich Stowell Aerobatics 28 January 2nd 09 03:26 PM
Homebuilt Aircraft Frequently Asked Questions List (FAQ) Ron Wanttaja Home Built 0 September 2nd 04 05:15 AM
us air force us air force academy us air force bases air force museum us us air force rank us air force reserve adfunk Jehad Internet Military Aviation 0 February 7th 04 05:24 AM
"I Want To FLY!"-(Youth) My store to raise funds for flying lessons Curtl33 General Aviation 7 January 10th 04 12:35 AM
PC flight simulators Bjørnar Bolsøy Military Aviation 178 December 14th 03 01:14 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2017 AviationBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.