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Recommendations for cataract surgery lenses for flying



 
 
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  #31  
Old March 23rd 18, 03:40 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Recommendations for cataract surgery lenses for flying

Separately from the discussion about lenses, that FAA brochure is conflating binocular vision and depth perception in general. Binocular vision is just one of many ways that our eye-brain system perceives depth, and it is only effective up to a distance of 6 feet or so. It is not of much relevance to landing an aircraft.
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  #32  
Old March 23rd 18, 04:30 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dan Marotta
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Default Recommendations for cataract surgery lenses for flying



On 3/22/2018 7:06 PM, jfitch wrote:
On Thursday, March 22, 2018 at 9:53:03 AM UTC-7, Dan Marotta wrote:
But why would anyone do that when he can have perfect uncorrected
distant vision and simply wear clear vision sunglasses with a bifocal
reader built in.* Seems silly, or maybe just vain, to me to go through
the suggested "alternatives".

On 3/22/2018 10:08 AM, jfitch wrote:
I've tried a mono vision contact lens, and thought it gave up quite a bit of far visual acuity. Of course a pilot can fly with just one eye, so again it depends. I know several pilots who have had monovision Lasik correction (one eye corrected for near vision).

--
Dan, 5J

I agree with you for flying, when sunglasses might be necessary anyway, in the rest of life glasses are a serious pain in the ass.

....And for those times, a pair of reading glasses suffices.* For me, at
least, my perfect vision begins just beyond the length of my arm and, to
read, I need glasses.* Of course it's different for others.
--
Dan, 5J
  #33  
Old March 24th 18, 05:19 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
jfitch
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Default Recommendations for cataract surgery lenses for flying

On Friday, March 23, 2018 at 8:40:29 AM UTC-7, wrote:
Separately from the discussion about lenses, that FAA brochure is conflating binocular vision and depth perception in general. Binocular vision is just one of many ways that our eye-brain system perceives depth, and it is only effective up to a distance of 6 feet or so. It is not of much relevance to landing an aircraft.


Lack of binocular vision didn't seem to bother Wylie Post.
  #34  
Old March 24th 18, 01:49 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Michael Opitz
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Default Recommendations for cataract surgery lenses for flying

At 05:19 24 March 2018, jfitch wrote:
On Friday, March 23, 2018 at 8:40:29 AM UTC-7,

wrote:
Separately from the discussion about lenses, that FAA brochure is

conflat=
ing binocular vision and depth perception in general. Binocular vision

is
=
just one of many ways that our eye-brain system perceives depth,

and it is
=
only effective up to a distance of 6 feet or so. It is not of much
relevan=
ce to landing an aircraft.

Lack of binocular vision didn't seem to bother Wylie Post.

We need an AME to weigh in on this one. I once flew with an airline
captain who had lost one eye and the hearing in one ear, but was
still flying as a captain with an FAA demonstrated ability waiver.

RO

  #35  
Old March 24th 18, 05:03 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
JB Gunner
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Default Recommendations for cataract surgery lenses for flying

On Saturday, March 24, 2018 at 10:00:07 AM UTC-4, Michael Opitz wrote:
At 05:19 24 March 2018, jfitch wrote:
On Friday, March 23, 2018 at 8:40:29 AM UTC-7,

wrote:
Separately from the discussion about lenses, that FAA brochure is

conflat=
ing binocular vision and depth perception in general. Binocular vision

is
=
just one of many ways that our eye-brain system perceives depth,

and it is
=
only effective up to a distance of 6 feet or so. It is not of much
relevan=
ce to landing an aircraft.

Lack of binocular vision didn't seem to bother Wylie Post.

We need an AME to weigh in on this one. I once flew with an airline
captain who had lost one eye and the hearing in one ear, but was
still flying as a captain with an FAA demonstrated ability waiver.

RO



the FAA website guide for AME clearly states:

the Examiner must counsel the applicant that use of contact
lens(es) for monovision correction is not allowed. The Examiner must note in Item 60 that this counseling has been given. Examples of unacceptable use include:

The use of a contact lens in one eye for near vision and in the other eye for distant vision (for example: pilots with myopia plus presbyopia).
The use of a contact lens in one eye for near vision and the use of no contact lens in the other eye (for example: pilots with presbyopia but no myopia)


I know there are medical exceptions given to those who may have restricted vision in one eye. But that would require a medical and a waiver issued by the FAA. We self certify. This is only a heads up to those who wish to have eye surgery to correct vision problems.
  #36  
Old March 24th 18, 06:15 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Recommendations for cataract surgery lenses for flying

On Tuesday, March 20, 2018 at 9:51:21 AM UTC-6, teck48 wrote:
I'm due for cataract surgery. Any good or bad experiences with lens implants for flying? Eye doc is recommending multi focus lenses (as opposed to mono focus). And a slightly different lens in each eye. Both multifocal, but dominant eye implant optimized for distance. Anyone have any experience? Thanks! –Tom


About a year an a half ago I had cataract surgery. At age 70 I decide that the clarity, distance and near of my vision was not what I wanted for flying and the ophthalmologist had been telling me I had cataracts. As a professional pilot I had used corrective glasses for at least 30 years but found those no longer gave me the field of vision I wanted to for soaring.
My research was inconclusive about multifocal lens implants. My wife had a bad experience with Lasik so the idea of two different lens did not excite me. I chose to have a TECNIS +3.25 implanted in my non dominant eye. I wanted 3 months during which I adjusted and experienced the new vision in that eye. Some haloing but the rest was impressive. Then I had the same lens implanted in the dominate eye.
Multifocal implants are relatively new. I based my choice on the prescription glasses I was using.
  #37  
Old March 27th 18, 03:56 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
teck48[_2_]
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Default Recommendations for cataract surgery lenses for flying

Thanks to all who responded. Time for some research! –Tom
  #38  
Old May 13th 18, 07:05 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Recommendations for cataract surgery lenses for flying

Hi I have had cataracts surgery 7 months ago and have extended depth of focus lenses called Symfony. They are slightly different than multifocal lenses which gives one 2 focal points. The vision I have is more seamless without a dip in clarity between the 2 focal points of a multifocal lens. There is a trade off of choosing a multifocal or EDOF lens and that is your night vision. I do know for commercial pilots only standard monofocal lenses to replace cataracts is acceptable. The multifocal and EDOF lenses have more glare and nighttime visuals (for example I see concentric circles around certain light sources at night). This may not be a trade off some people want to get rid of glasses.
  #39  
Old May 13th 18, 07:14 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Recommendations for cataract surgery lenses for flying

Hi Peter - just responded to Tom above. The lenses I have are EDOF (extended depth of focus) Symfony IOLs. Many lump these into multifocal lenses group. Regardless of EDOF or multifocal the trade off is not clarity for distance (unless the power is off or there is astigmatism present). Trade off is the night vision. I would think pilots who fly at night would not want that compromise and those who fly commercially I have read are not permitted to select anything but a multifocal lens. with the Symfony lenses I have excellent vision during the day but starting at dusk I see concentric circles around certain light sources. At the beginning it was hard to drive at night. I have adapted but still don’t choose to drive long distances in unfamiliar areas at night.
 




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