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Curious about flying in IFR



 
 
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  #11  
Old November 12th 15, 09:12 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Larry Dighera
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Default Curious about flying in IFR

On Sat, 7 Nov 2015 07:06:27 +1200, george152 wrote:

On 11/7/2015 4:41 AM, Larry Dighera wrote:


Flying in IMC is a great exercise of the brain.


I once wrote in 1998:

"For me, IFR flight is a lot like playing a game of Chess in the
blind while juggling three balls in the air and maintaining a
running conversation at a noisy cocktail party. You have to
mentally visualize the position of the "pieces" on the "board,"
continually monitor and interpret a myriad of arcane instruments
and make corrections to keep the airplane shinny side up, all
while constantly attempting to pick out the ATC communiques
intended for you from the rest of the "guests'" conversations. To
this add the _stress_ of the consequences of losing the game
(death). (Of course, this analogy fails to consider weather,
turbulence, flight planning, interpreting charts and plates,
tuning radios and OBS settings, equipment failures, ....)

Single-pilot IFR aircraft operation in the ATC system in IMC
without the benefit of Global Positioning Satellite receiver,
auto-pilot, and Active Noise Reduction headset, is probably one of
the most demanding things you will ever do."

Good summation.

With the cockpits of today a lot of the small parts are taken away.

But it still demands a high level of discipline




Thanks for the complement, George.

I still vividly recall an IFR flight during my training. My instructor, Dan
Newman, and I were always hoping for some "actual" conditions, so that I'd have
a better idea of what to expect once I was on my own. One particularly wet
day, we were in the office trying to decide if the weather may be a bit too
much for our scheduled lesson. Just then, in a gust of wind an instructor and
his student, burst into the office all exuberant and spirited. They had just
landed, and said that it had been a pretty rough ride, and traffic was thick,
but they thought we should launch.

So we pre-flighted and filed from KSBA (John Wayne, Santa Ana, California) to
KVNY (Van Nuys). We departed in heavy rain, and soon entered KLAX (Los
Angeles) busy Class Bravo terminal area. Turbulence was significant, and
visibility was nonexistent, and it sounded like the sky was full of airliners.

Attempting to contact the controller in the next sector, who sounded a bit
overwhelmed with his workload, was a real chore, as we couldn't get a word in
edgewise, and he was giving the airline traffic priority. About that time, we
must have entered a cell or something, as I was only able to hold heading
within about plus or minus 30 degrees, and altitude was all over the place too.
I felt like a cowboy at his first rodeo, but hung in there without the
necessity of the instructor taking the controls. Finally, we proceeded via
radar vectors to the KVNY runway 34L approach, and broke out of the overcast to
see a soggy runway on the nose. A gusty cross wind nearly blew me off the edge
of the runway into the grass as I was about to touch down, but was able to
recover successfully, and plant it firmly on the macadam. Whew! What a
memorable ride. :-)

Ads
  #12  
Old November 13th 15, 02:57 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Robert Moore
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Posts: 134
Default Curious about flying in IFR

Larry Dighera wrote
A gusty cross wind nearly blew me
off the edge of the runway into the grass as I was about to touch
down, but was able to recover successfully, and plant it firmly on the
macadam. Whew! What a memorable ride. :-)


MACADAM....?????

I would suggest that you do a "Wikipedia" on "macadam", "tarmac",
and "asphalt". I'm 80 years old and haven't heard the word macadam
used since I was a child. I constantly hear "tarmac" mis-used by the
news media who mean to say "apron" or if you were in the Navy, "ramp".

Bob Moore

  #13  
Old November 13th 15, 10:27 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Larry Dighera
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Posts: 3,834
Default Curious about flying in IFR

On 13 Nov 2015 14:57:44 GMT, Robert Moore wrote:

Larry Dighera wrote
A gusty cross wind nearly blew me
off the edge of the runway into the grass as I was about to touch
down, but was able to recover successfully, and plant it firmly on the
macadam. Whew! What a memorable ride. :-)


MACADAM....?????

I would suggest that you do a "Wikipedia" on "macadam", "tarmac",
and "asphalt". I'm 80 years old and haven't heard the word macadam
used since I was a child. I constantly hear "tarmac" mis-used by the
news media who mean to say "apron" or if you were in the Navy, "ramp".

Bob Moore



Hello Bob,

I'm happy you found my little story of interest. And it's always a treat to
hear from an ATP and former PanAm captain, not to mention flight instructor...
Given the fact that I'm currently enjoying my seniorhood, the word "macadam" is
somewhat familiar to me. Here's what Merriam-Webster has to say about the
word's definition: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/macadam

macadam
noun mac·ad·am \m?-'ka-d?m\
: a road surface made with a dark material that contains small broken
stones

Full Definition of MACADAM

: macadamized roadway or pavement especially with a bituminous binder


Here's the Dictionary.com entry:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/macadam?s=t

macadam
[muh-kad-uh m]

noun
1. a macadamized road or pavement.
2. the broken stone used in making such a road.
3. a road surface made of compressed layers of small broken stones, esp one
that is bound together with tar or asphalt

So, while the word does indeed date from the early nineteenth century, it does
seem to describe the KVNY Runway surface accurately. Given that many English
words originated a long time ago, I believe I'll continue using 'macadam'.

How about regaleing us with an IFR antidote from your illustrious career. I'm
sure you could relate many interesting tales, perhaps something that might
entice the OP into obtaining an instrument rating and becoming a more
professional pilot.

Best regards,
Larry
  #14  
Old November 14th 15, 04:03 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Dudley Henriques[_3_]
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Posts: 65
Default Curious about flying in IFR

On Friday, November 13, 2015 at 5:26:37 PM UTC-5, Larry Dighera wrote:
On 13 Nov 2015 14:57:44 GMT, Robert Moore wrote:

Larry Dighera wrote
A gusty cross wind nearly blew me
off the edge of the runway into the grass as I was about to touch
down, but was able to recover successfully, and plant it firmly on the
macadam. Whew! What a memorable ride. :-)


MACADAM....?????

I would suggest that you do a "Wikipedia" on "macadam", "tarmac",
and "asphalt". I'm 80 years old and haven't heard the word macadam
used since I was a child. I constantly hear "tarmac" mis-used by the
news media who mean to say "apron" or if you were in the Navy, "ramp".

Bob Moore



Hello Bob,

I'm happy you found my little story of interest. And it's always a treat to
hear from an ATP and former PanAm captain, not to mention flight instructor...
Given the fact that I'm currently enjoying my seniorhood, the word "macadam" is
somewhat familiar to me. Here's what Merriam-Webster has to say about the
word's definition: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/macadam

macadam
noun mac·ad·am \m?-'ka-d?m\
: a road surface made with a dark material that contains small broken
stones

Full Definition of MACADAM

: macadamized roadway or pavement especially with a bituminous binder


Here's the Dictionary.com entry:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/macadam?s=t

macadam
[muh-kad-uh m]

noun
1. a macadamized road or pavement.
2. the broken stone used in making such a road.
3. a road surface made of compressed layers of small broken stones, esp one
that is bound together with tar or asphalt

So, while the word does indeed date from the early nineteenth century, it does
seem to describe the KVNY Runway surface accurately. Given that many English
words originated a long time ago, I believe I'll continue using 'macadam'..

How about regaleing us with an IFR antidote from your illustrious career. I'm
sure you could relate many interesting tales, perhaps something that might
entice the OP into obtaining an instrument rating and becoming a more
professional pilot.

Best regards,
Larry


I have to laugh !!!! :-)))))))))) What's it been........10.....12 years now since I last "met" with Mr. Moore on this forum.
Same situation, different scenario of course, but the same old thing......for some ungodly reason, his seemingly unending need to correct people. :-))))
No big deal really, but it has always amused me how years of communication and friendly dialog were wasted between two men (Mr Moore and myself) with different but vast backgrounds in aviation who otherwise might have been friends. It's almost unbelievable to stop by here after all these years and find the exact same situation in play. :-)))
Anyway.................Hello Mr. Moore. Hope you have been well. Take care down there in Fl.

Dudley Henriques
 




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