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Need help with a rocket motor ID



 
 
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  #21  
Old February 3rd 07, 07:12 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
jc[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Need help with a rocket motor ID

On Fri, 2 Feb 2007 18:38:32 +1030, "Dave Kearton"
wrote:

I've just received a few pics of a small rocket motor, from a friend of
mine.

It's about 2Kg and about 45cm long with a 10cm wide nozzle. It's a
liquid fuel motor and doesn't look like it has any electrical connections.

We're all guessing it could be some form of reaction nozzle for (maybe) a
Gemini or Apollo capsule.

Can I buy a vowel please ?


Dave,
Not much of a vowel but here's the stuff I got from a bud
who's pretty heavy into rocketry (I am not). He didn't know
what it was, specifically, but here's a bit more info you
can add to the stew.

One other note, Q is correct about the "SN63(4??), which is
preceeded by what looks like a part #, which looks to me
like it may be " ?07705"
Cheers,
jc

"About all I can add to this discussion is that I'd agree
it's probably designed for hypergols since there's no
provision for ignition. Hypergols are binary propellants
that use 2 liquids that spontaneously combust on contact.
The only 2 I can name are furfuryl alcohol with hydrogen
peroxide and the WW2 German bstoff and cstoff. That was the
stuff used in the ME163 Comet rocket plane, I'm pretty sure
one of the stoffs was hydrazine. That's some nasty stuff, it
dissolves flesh. I've heard stories about accidental leaks
and human soup. Yuck!

Looking at the pictures a couple of other things strike me.
Obviously there's no gimbal on the nozzle so it's not a
manuvering jet. I'd guess either a seperation motor for a
really big stage or possibly some kind of retro-fire thing.
The other thing is the way the fluid lines wrap around the
can looks like preheat to me. That either means a fuel that
doesn't vaporize easily, like kerosene, or a cold soaked
environment. That goes along with the idea that it's
designed for vacuum.

Where did the guy get it? Looks like government surplus to
me. Hope my input helps."

Ads
  #22  
Old February 3rd 07, 07:40 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
Dave Kearton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,453
Default Need help with a rocket motor ID

"jc" wrote in message
...


Dave,
Not much of a vowel but here's the stuff I got from a bud
who's pretty heavy into rocketry (I am not). He didn't know
what it was, specifically, but here's a bit more info you
can add to the stew.

One other note, Q is correct about the "SN63(4??), which is
preceeded by what looks like a part #, which looks to me
like it may be " ?07705"
Cheers,
jc

"About all I can add to this discussion is that I'd agree
it's probably designed for hypergols since there's no
provision for ignition. Hypergols are binary propellants
that use 2 liquids that spontaneously combust on contact.
The only 2 I can name are furfuryl alcohol with hydrogen
peroxide and the WW2 German bstoff and cstoff. That was the
stuff used in the ME163 Comet rocket plane, I'm pretty sure
one of the stoffs was hydrazine. That's some nasty stuff, it
dissolves flesh. I've heard stories about accidental leaks
and human soup. Yuck!

Looking at the pictures a couple of other things strike me.
Obviously there's no gimbal on the nozzle so it's not a
manuvering jet. I'd guess either a seperation motor for a
really big stage or possibly some kind of retro-fire thing.
The other thing is the way the fluid lines wrap around the
can looks like preheat to me. That either means a fuel that
doesn't vaporize easily, like kerosene, or a cold soaked
environment. That goes along with the idea that it's
designed for vacuum.

Where did the guy get it? Looks like government surplus to
me. Hope my input helps."



Thanks, every little bit helps.




I'm currently trying to get comparision pics of the Rocketdyne LR64-NA-4
from the AQM-37. It was a fairly common engine - over 5K in service
and possibly matches the size of the engine with the airframe.




--

Cheers

Dave Kearton


  #23  
Old February 3rd 07, 07:40 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
Dave Kearton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,453
Default Need help with a rocket motor ID

"jc" wrote in message
...


Dave,
Not much of a vowel but here's the stuff I got from a bud
who's pretty heavy into rocketry (I am not). He didn't know
what it was, specifically, but here's a bit more info you
can add to the stew.

One other note, Q is correct about the "SN63(4??), which is
preceeded by what looks like a part #, which looks to me
like it may be " ?07705"
Cheers,
jc

"About all I can add to this discussion is that I'd agree
it's probably designed for hypergols since there's no
provision for ignition. Hypergols are binary propellants
that use 2 liquids that spontaneously combust on contact.
The only 2 I can name are furfuryl alcohol with hydrogen
peroxide and the WW2 German bstoff and cstoff. That was the
stuff used in the ME163 Comet rocket plane, I'm pretty sure
one of the stoffs was hydrazine. That's some nasty stuff, it
dissolves flesh. I've heard stories about accidental leaks
and human soup. Yuck!

Looking at the pictures a couple of other things strike me.
Obviously there's no gimbal on the nozzle so it's not a
manuvering jet. I'd guess either a seperation motor for a
really big stage or possibly some kind of retro-fire thing.
The other thing is the way the fluid lines wrap around the
can looks like preheat to me. That either means a fuel that
doesn't vaporize easily, like kerosene, or a cold soaked
environment. That goes along with the idea that it's
designed for vacuum.

Where did the guy get it? Looks like government surplus to
me. Hope my input helps."



Thanks, every little bit helps.




I'm currently trying to get comparision pics of the Rocketdyne LR64-NA-4
from the AQM-37. It was a fairly common engine - over 5K in service
and possibly matches the size of the engine with the airframe.




--

Cheers

Dave Kearton


  #24  
Old February 3rd 07, 10:14 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
David E
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Need help with a rocket motor ID

well this is a mixing chamber for a chrop duster. looks like its a old
grummend agcat around the 1960 design, the corossion has me worried...
"Dave Kearton" wrote in message
...
"jc" wrote in message
...


Dave,
Not much of a vowel but here's the stuff I got from a bud
who's pretty heavy into rocketry (I am not). He didn't know
what it was, specifically, but here's a bit more info you
can add to the stew.

One other note, Q is correct about the "SN63(4??), which is
preceeded by what looks like a part #, which looks to me
like it may be " ?07705"
Cheers,
jc

"About all I can add to this discussion is that I'd agree
it's probably designed for hypergols since there's no
provision for ignition. Hypergols are binary propellants
that use 2 liquids that spontaneously combust on contact.
The only 2 I can name are furfuryl alcohol with hydrogen
peroxide and the WW2 German bstoff and cstoff. That was the
stuff used in the ME163 Comet rocket plane, I'm pretty sure
one of the stoffs was hydrazine. That's some nasty stuff, it
dissolves flesh. I've heard stories about accidental leaks
and human soup. Yuck!

Looking at the pictures a couple of other things strike me.
Obviously there's no gimbal on the nozzle so it's not a
manuvering jet. I'd guess either a seperation motor for a
really big stage or possibly some kind of retro-fire thing.
The other thing is the way the fluid lines wrap around the
can looks like preheat to me. That either means a fuel that
doesn't vaporize easily, like kerosene, or a cold soaked
environment. That goes along with the idea that it's
designed for vacuum.

Where did the guy get it? Looks like government surplus to
me. Hope my input helps."



Thanks, every little bit helps.




I'm currently trying to get comparision pics of the Rocketdyne LR64-NA-4
from the AQM-37. It was a fairly common engine - over 5K in
service and possibly matches the size of the engine with the airframe.




--

Cheers

Dave Kearton




  #25  
Old February 3rd 07, 10:14 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
David E
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Need help with a rocket motor ID

well this is a mixing chamber for a chrop duster. looks like its a old
grummend agcat around the 1960 design, the corossion has me worried...
"Dave Kearton" wrote in message
...
"jc" wrote in message
...


Dave,
Not much of a vowel but here's the stuff I got from a bud
who's pretty heavy into rocketry (I am not). He didn't know
what it was, specifically, but here's a bit more info you
can add to the stew.

One other note, Q is correct about the "SN63(4??), which is
preceeded by what looks like a part #, which looks to me
like it may be " ?07705"
Cheers,
jc

"About all I can add to this discussion is that I'd agree
it's probably designed for hypergols since there's no
provision for ignition. Hypergols are binary propellants
that use 2 liquids that spontaneously combust on contact.
The only 2 I can name are furfuryl alcohol with hydrogen
peroxide and the WW2 German bstoff and cstoff. That was the
stuff used in the ME163 Comet rocket plane, I'm pretty sure
one of the stoffs was hydrazine. That's some nasty stuff, it
dissolves flesh. I've heard stories about accidental leaks
and human soup. Yuck!

Looking at the pictures a couple of other things strike me.
Obviously there's no gimbal on the nozzle so it's not a
manuvering jet. I'd guess either a seperation motor for a
really big stage or possibly some kind of retro-fire thing.
The other thing is the way the fluid lines wrap around the
can looks like preheat to me. That either means a fuel that
doesn't vaporize easily, like kerosene, or a cold soaked
environment. That goes along with the idea that it's
designed for vacuum.

Where did the guy get it? Looks like government surplus to
me. Hope my input helps."



Thanks, every little bit helps.




I'm currently trying to get comparision pics of the Rocketdyne LR64-NA-4
from the AQM-37. It was a fairly common engine - over 5K in
service and possibly matches the size of the engine with the airframe.




--

Cheers

Dave Kearton




  #26  
Old February 3rd 07, 10:17 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
William R Thompson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 150
Default Need help with a rocket motor ID

"jc" wrote:

"About all I can add to this discussion is that I'd agree
it's probably designed for hypergols since there's no
provision for ignition. Hypergols are binary propellants
that use 2 liquids that spontaneously combust on contact.
The only 2 I can name are furfuryl alcohol with hydrogen
peroxide and the WW2 German bstoff and cstoff. That was the
stuff used in the ME163 Comet rocket plane, I'm pretty sure
one of the stoffs was hydrazine. That's some nasty stuff, it
dissolves flesh. I've heard stories about accidental leaks
and human soup. Yuck!


Manzo Zeigler's "Rocket Fighter" describes C-stoff as
"thirty percent hydrazine hydrate solution in methyl alcohol"
and T-stoff as "forty-eight percent concentrated hydrogen
peroxide and a mixture of hydrocarbon compounds." Some
brilliant and possibly pro-Ally designer placed extra fuel tanks
inside the cockpit.

A few years ago I listened to a lecture by a rocket engineer
who had known one of the Komet's engineers. When asked
about the Komet's lethality the German said "It did not kill
half its pilots! It killed no more than one in three!"

--Bill Thompson


  #27  
Old February 3rd 07, 10:17 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
William R Thompson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 150
Default Need help with a rocket motor ID

"jc" wrote:

"About all I can add to this discussion is that I'd agree
it's probably designed for hypergols since there's no
provision for ignition. Hypergols are binary propellants
that use 2 liquids that spontaneously combust on contact.
The only 2 I can name are furfuryl alcohol with hydrogen
peroxide and the WW2 German bstoff and cstoff. That was the
stuff used in the ME163 Comet rocket plane, I'm pretty sure
one of the stoffs was hydrazine. That's some nasty stuff, it
dissolves flesh. I've heard stories about accidental leaks
and human soup. Yuck!


Manzo Zeigler's "Rocket Fighter" describes C-stoff as
"thirty percent hydrazine hydrate solution in methyl alcohol"
and T-stoff as "forty-eight percent concentrated hydrogen
peroxide and a mixture of hydrocarbon compounds." Some
brilliant and possibly pro-Ally designer placed extra fuel tanks
inside the cockpit.

A few years ago I listened to a lecture by a rocket engineer
who had known one of the Komet's engineers. When asked
about the Komet's lethality the German said "It did not kill
half its pilots! It killed no more than one in three!"

--Bill Thompson


  #28  
Old February 3rd 07, 01:56 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
Dave Kearton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,453
Default Need help with a rocket motor ID - no more calls, we have our winner.

"Dave Kearton" wrote in
message ...




I'm currently trying to get comparision pics of the Rocketdyne LR64-NA-4
from the AQM-37. It was a fairly common engine - over 5K in
service and possibly matches the size of the engine with the airframe.







As Esmarelda whispered to Quasimodo "It's only a hunch, but I can't ignore
it"





I'm pretty sure the beast we're looking at is an LR64 variant, leastways
that's close enough for me. I've sent a pic off to PWR and hopefully
they'll own up to it as well.




http://www.aeroconsystems.com/motors/lr64.htm




Thanks to everyone for their thoughts - except for the retard on
sci.space.history who told me to do my own research. I think my way
was a lot more educational.



--

Cheers

Dave Kearton


  #29  
Old February 3rd 07, 01:56 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
Dave Kearton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,453
Default Need help with a rocket motor ID - no more calls, we have our winner.

"Dave Kearton" wrote in
message ...




I'm currently trying to get comparision pics of the Rocketdyne LR64-NA-4
from the AQM-37. It was a fairly common engine - over 5K in
service and possibly matches the size of the engine with the airframe.







As Esmarelda whispered to Quasimodo "It's only a hunch, but I can't ignore
it"





I'm pretty sure the beast we're looking at is an LR64 variant, leastways
that's close enough for me. I've sent a pic off to PWR and hopefully
they'll own up to it as well.




http://www.aeroconsystems.com/motors/lr64.htm




Thanks to everyone for their thoughts - except for the retard on
sci.space.history who told me to do my own research. I think my way
was a lot more educational.



--

Cheers

Dave Kearton


  #30  
Old February 3rd 07, 02:18 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
William R Thompson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 150
Default Need help with a rocket motor ID - no more calls, we have our winner.

"Dave Kearton" wrote:

I'm currently trying to get comparision pics of the Rocketdyne LR64-NA-4
from the AQM-37. It was a fairly common engine - over 5K in
service and possibly matches the size of the engine with the airframe.


As Esmarelda whispered to Quasimodo "It's only a hunch, but I can't ignore
it"


I'm pretty sure the beast we're looking at is an LR64 variant, leastways
that's close enough for me. I've sent a pic off to PWR and
hopefully
they'll own up to it as well.


http://www.aeroconsystems.com/motors/lr64.htm


Thanks to everyone for their thoughts - except for the retard on
sci.space.history who told me to do my own research. I think my
way
was a lot more educational.


I think you have it. Here's another picture, from

http://www.astronautix.com/engines/p41ainer.htm

--Bill Thompson




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