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[books] aircraft and engine



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 3rd 07, 12:31 PM posted to rec.aviation.misc
Élodie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default [books] aircraft and engine

Dear all,

I've just published my books : one about aircraft characteristics, and
another one about turbofan and turbojet engines. May be they could interest
you, that's the reason why I leave this message.

I'm glad to present you :

Title: Avions civils à réaction : plan 3 vues et données caractéristiques
Abstract: This book shows the characteristics of about 1500 aircraft
equipped with turbojet or turbofan engines.
It deals with airliners, freighters, business aircraft, ...
In order to make this book easier to use, aircraft specifications are shown
in the same synthetic way: 3 view drawings, dimensions, mass data,
powerplant, and performances data (with the payload-Range diagram).
http://www.elodieroux.com/EditionsElodieRouxAvions.html


You should also discover my other book about aircraft engines.

Title: Turbofan and Turbojet Engines: database handbook
Abstract: This book is a collection of the characteristics of about 1500
turbofan and turbojet engines, with or without afterburner. These engines
are implanted on many kinds of aircrafts: airliners, freighters, business
aircrafts, fighters, experimental aircrafts, gnopters...
In order to facilitate the use of this book, engine characteristics are
shown in the same synthetic way: thrust, specific fuel consumption, engine
weight, bypass-ratio, overall pressure ratio, turbine entry temperature ...
http://www.elodieroux.com/EditionsEl...uxEngines.html
This book is also available in French.
http://www.elodieroux.com/EditionsEl...uxMoteurs.html

If you would like to better discover all books published by Elodie Roux
Editions, some extracted pages are available on: www.elodieroux.com

Best regards,

Elodie Roux.



Ads
  #2  
Old June 3rd 07, 12:48 PM posted to rec.aviation.misc
Ron Hardin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 30
Default [books] aircraft and engine

Élodie wrote:

Dear all,

I've just published my books : one about aircraft characteristics, and
another one about turbofan and turbojet engines. May be they could interest
you, that's the reason why I leave this message.


I've always wondered why the exhaust doesn't just blow out the front,
in jet engines.

--
Ron Hardin


On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
  #3  
Old June 3rd 07, 01:32 PM posted to rec.aviation.misc
Élodie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default [books] aircraft and engine

what do you mean ?


  #4  
Old June 3rd 07, 02:04 PM posted to rec.aviation.misc
Ron Hardin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 30
Default [books] aircraft and engine

Élodie wrote:

what do you mean ?


Well, you've got this combustion chamber, and you add fuel, and
ignite it.

It's open on the front and the back.

Why doesn't the combustion product simply blow out the front and
the back both? Leaving you sitting on the runway exactly where
you started.

The buzz bomb solved this in the only sensible way. The vanes shut
and then you blow up the fuel. So the Germans saw the problem.
--
Ron Hardin


On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
  #5  
Old June 5th 07, 09:21 PM posted to rec.aviation.misc
Darrel Toepfer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 289
Default [books] aircraft and engine

Ron Hardin wrote:

Well, you've got this combustion chamber, and you add fuel, and
ignite it.

It's open on the front and the back.

Why doesn't the combustion product simply blow out the front and
the back both? Leaving you sitting on the runway exactly where
you started.

The buzz bomb solved this in the only sensible way. The vanes shut
and then you blow up the fuel. So the Germans saw the problem.


Starter motor (electric or otherwise) starts the blades spinning to get
the sucking and blowing cycle geauxing... Don't introduce fuel and
ignite it until adequate RPM's are established...

Quote On
The process for starting a gas turbine engine is a complicated procedure
which requires continual monitoring of various engine parameters to
avoid damaging engine components. One potentially damaging condition
which may arise during engine startup is a hot start. The exact cause of
a hot start condition in a gas turbine engine has been the subject of
much speculation and theory, however, the detection of the occurrence of
a hot start condition is well known.

A hot start condition occurs when the temperature of the working fluid
exiting the turbine section of the gas turbine engine exceeds, by a
certain amount, the expected exhaust gas temperature schedule for the
engine during a normal startup. As will be appreciated by those skilled
in the art, an unaddressed hot start condition can cause the gas
temperature in the turbine section to exceed allowable material
temperature limits, thereby shortening or ending the life of internal
engine components such as blades, disks, seals, etc. Typical engine
starting procedures therefore call for careful monitoring of the exhaust
gas temperature, and immediate shutdown of the startup sequence should
exhaust gas temperature exceed the appropriate limit.
Quote Off

MediVac helicopter pilot had a bad day here at the local airport awhile
back. Landed for refueling and then toasted one engine on restart.
Couple days later, they replaced the engine (and probably the pilot) and
left...

As I am told, Garret engines are cheaper but more prone to hotstarts.
Computer control has made it more foolproof, but also more costly...

The History of Engines - How Engines Work
Part 2: A Short History and Timeline of Gas Turbine Engines
http://inventors.about.com/library/i...gasturbine.htm
  #6  
Old June 5th 07, 10:11 PM posted to rec.aviation.misc
Ron Hardin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 30
Default [books] aircraft and engine

Darrel Toepfer wrote:

Ron Hardin wrote:

Well, you've got this combustion chamber, and you add fuel, and
ignite it.

It's open on the front and the back.

Why doesn't the combustion product simply blow out the front and
the back both? Leaving you sitting on the runway exactly where
you started.

The buzz bomb solved this in the only sensible way. The vanes shut
and then you blow up the fuel. So the Germans saw the problem.


Starter motor (electric or otherwise) starts the blades spinning to get
the sucking and blowing cycle geauxing... Don't introduce fuel and
ignite it until adequate RPM's are established...


Of course, the exhaust blowing out the front turns the turbine backwards,
and the exhaust blowing out the back turns it forwards. You're where you
started, in explaining it.
--
Ron Hardin


On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
  #7  
Old June 6th 07, 01:05 AM posted to rec.aviation.misc
[email protected][_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 81
Default [books] aircraft and engine

On Tue, 05 Jun 2007 21:11:46 GMT, Ron Hardin
wrote:

Of course, the exhaust blowing out the front turns the turbine backwards,
and the exhaust blowing out the back turns it forwards. You're where you
started, in explaining it.


If this is a serious question, it may have something to do with the
fact that more of the energy produced by burning the fuel is used
driving the compressor than is used for propulsion.

TC
  #9  
Old June 6th 07, 12:03 PM posted to rec.aviation.misc
Darrel Toepfer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 289
Default [books] aircraft and engine

Ron Hardin wrote:

Of course, the exhaust blowing out the front turns the turbine backwards,
and the exhaust blowing out the back turns it forwards. You're where you
started, in explaining it.


Doubtful...

The starter motor spins it in a set direction. You'd have to reverse the
polarity, if electrically driven...

The only fear is that of a "hot start" which has already be explained. Or
perhaps if you had a massive tailwind and no means of turning the plane
into the wind for startup...
  #10  
Old June 6th 07, 12:35 PM posted to rec.aviation.misc
Ron Hardin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 30
Default [books] aircraft and engine

Darrel Toepfer wrote:

Ron Hardin wrote:

Of course, the exhaust blowing out the front turns the turbine backwards,
and the exhaust blowing out the back turns it forwards. You're where you
started, in explaining it.


Doubtful...

The starter motor spins it in a set direction. You'd have to reverse the
polarity, if electrically driven...

The only fear is that of a "hot start" which has already be explained. Or
perhaps if you had a massive tailwind and no means of turning the plane
into the wind for startup...


That the turbine is spinning doesn't matter to the objection. The exhaust going
to the rear spins it up, the exhaust going to the front slows it down. Net effect,
zero. How does the exhaust keep it spinning?

--
Ron Hardin


On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
 




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