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  #1  
Old January 10th 18, 05:48 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Steve Leonard[_2_]
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Chip Bearden wrote:

Wait...those aren't allowed anymore. Living in the past. How many on this group recall those "exciting" dashes back to the contest, throwing the glider together as fast as possible, and relaunching, hoping to do better the second time? The rapid assembly was sometimes made easier by taking some shortcuts in the derigging process at the landout site. We once hauled our 1-26 back without installing the spar hold down bolts on the trailer by parking someone in the back of the station wagon to to make sure the wings didn't slide off the trailer during the 10 mile drive back to the contest site. A long time ago.

Chip Bearden

Heck, I heard someone didn't even bother to de-rig their 1-26, but just auto towed it back to the contest site. Power lines added excitement. Had to release and fly around corners, then land, hook back up and go again. Long rope? Long enough to let you go high enough to clear the on-coming trucks!

Gone are the days. Thank goodness!

Steve Leonard
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  #2  
Old January 10th 18, 06:39 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Oh geez Steve, they've taken away all our fun!
  #3  
Old January 10th 18, 06:49 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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I wonder how much of the adventure has been taken out of soaring by the rise of sustainer systems. The andrenalin of a low save and making it home is lost knowing that you can always just pop out the engine. It's opened up new areas to fly safely - but is it really the same? How many of the +1000km flights we are seeing now everyday on OLC would be taking place with out sustainer equipped sailplanes?
  #4  
Old January 10th 18, 07:10 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Clint, I feel the advent of sustainers, while great for recreational flying, has changed the complexion of setting records and racing. Sustainers provide a safety net which results in guys being able to take chances they normally would not take when flying a conventional glider. No one can tell me that guys fly a course in a sustainer the same as a non motor equiped machine.

They are given a built in advantage in searching for lift and traversing areas of having "iffy" conditions. They should be placed in their own catagory in records and in racing.

This very issue was discussed in the 1950's by the SSA rules committee, you can find their discussions in the archived records. I believe the first big discussion was in 1955. At that time they ruled against allowing motorized gliders to race with conventionals for these very reasons.

Dan
  #6  
Old January 10th 18, 08:21 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Andy Blackburn[_3_]
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On Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at 12:10:09 PM UTC-6, wrote:
"Sustainers provide a safety net which results in guys being able to take chances they normally would not take when flying a conventional glider. No one can tell me that guys fly a course in a sustainer the same as a non motor equiped machine."


Yikes! That seems like a foolish dice-rolling approach to using a device that does't work 100% of the time.

I decrease my probability of having a field landing and ground retrieve, but trade that in for an increased probability of killing myself. What on earth are people thinking?

I generally associate an adrenaline rush while flying with an inescapable sense that I've done something very, very stupid. Not at all enjoyable.

If you enjoy flying gliders for the sensation of risking your life, my advice is you should stop before you have a little bit too much fun.

Andy
  #7  
Old January 10th 18, 08:28 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Yes I agree with you Andy, but racing is racing for a good number of guys and I know they choose to take those chances. If they choose to, well thats their business, but for the sake of the competition it does change the dynamic. Thats what the SSA was worried about back in the day.
  #8  
Old January 10th 18, 08:31 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Charlie M. (UH & 002 owner/pilot)
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Yep, heard the same. IIRC it was in Texas, 1-26 (green pickle?), had to release now and then due to wires across the road.....right on up there with the "Fonz" doing a ground loop over a field of 2' stumps to land on a road next to the stump field and next to tall trees......when asked how he got there, he just smiled....typical of the Fonz if you knew him. I miss the Fonz.

The making of MAJOR war stories......sorta glad some of mine are no where near as exciting, other than Mom ripping the exhaust off a company car going into the BOTTOM of a gravel pit to help retrieve a 1-26 I had landed there.......sigh.....
  #9  
Old January 10th 18, 08:34 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Bob Kuykendall
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Few skiers pine for the days before ski lifts, when they'd snowshoe up the hill for a run.
  #10  
Old January 10th 18, 08:35 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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On Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at 1:10:09 PM UTC-5, wrote:
Clint, I feel the advent of sustainers, while great for recreational flying, has changed the complexion of setting records and racing. Sustainers provide a safety net which results in guys being able to take chances they normally would not take when flying a conventional glider. No one can tell me that guys fly a course in a sustainer the same as a non motor equiped machine.

They are given a built in advantage in searching for lift and traversing areas of having "iffy" conditions. They should be placed in their own catagory in records and in racing.

This very issue was discussed in the 1950's by the SSA rules committee, you can find their discussions in the archived records. I believe the first big discussion was in 1955. At that time they ruled against allowing motorized gliders to race with conventionals for these very reasons.

Dan


Excluding the motor guys because "they're not like us" may make some people feel better but it forces them to either go away or form their own group. Neither option does participation much good.
We need all the participants we can get.
UH
 




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