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Of parachutes and things



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 28th 04, 06:24 PM
ShawnD2112
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Default Of parachutes and things

Was hoping to get a bit of expertise here. I'm in the market for an
emergency bailout chute for flying in my Pitts S-1D. The top US contenders
seem to be National and Softie but with no experience in the field, and
parachutes not exactly being the kind of object you can try on for size in
the shop, I don't really know what to look for and what to avoid. I'd
appreciate any tips anyone out there could provide. Are there any European
models that anyone has any experience with? Obviously comfort and space in
the cockpit are major considerations.

Thanks!
Shawn


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  #2  
Old June 28th 04, 06:57 PM
Todd Pattist
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Default

"ShawnD2112" wrote:

Was hoping to get a bit of expertise here. I'm in the market for an
emergency bailout chute for flying in my Pitts S-1D. The top US contenders
seem to be National and Softie but with no experience in the field, and
parachutes not exactly being the kind of object you can try on for size in
the shop, I don't really know what to look for and what to avoid. I'd
appreciate any tips anyone out there could provide. Are there any European
models that anyone has any experience with? Obviously comfort and space in
the cockpit are major considerations.


Glider pilots routinely fly with parachutes. You may also
want to ask in rec.aviation.soaring. I've flown with
National, Butler and Softie. The usual discussion is
whether it fits into the space available in the cockpit. If
you're buying new, talk to a reputable supplier and tell
them your height (for sizing), weight (right
diameter/descent rate) and aircraft type (you want something
that's comfortable in your type of seat.)

Under TSO C23b, which covers most emergency chutes, some
chutes are "low speed category" for under 150 mph aircraft
and some are "standard category" with no limits (but manfr
will usually give some limits.) Some chutes are certified
under TSO C23c which has three categories A,B and C. B is
the minimum you'd want to consider (150 KIAS at a gross
weight of 254 lb.)

Comfort is paramount. I sat in my Softie for a 12.5 hour
flight.


Todd Pattist
(Remove DONTSPAMME from address to email reply.)
___
Make a commitment to learn something from every flight.
Share what you learn.
  #3  
Old June 28th 04, 07:21 PM
Dale
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Default

In article [email protected],
"ShawnD2112" wrote:

Was hoping to get a bit of expertise here. I'm in the market for an
emergency bailout chute for flying in my Pitts S-1D. The top US contenders
seem to be National and Softie but with no experience in the field, and
parachutes not exactly being the kind of object you can try on for size in
the shop, I don't really know what to look for and what to avoid. I'd
appreciate any tips anyone out there could provide. Are there any European
models that anyone has any experience with? Obviously comfort and space in
the cockpit are major considerations.


I wear a parachute for all my flying. I much prefer the Softie to the
Strong rig we have. The Softie comes in many different styles/models.
As far as canopy choice, I want a canopy that is going to work at any
speed I might exit the airplane....as Todd noted that are different
certifcation criteria.

--
Dale L. Falk

There is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing
as simply messing around with airplanes.

http://home.gci.net/~sncdfalk/flying.html
  #4  
Old June 28th 04, 08:21 PM
Dudley Henriques
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Posts: n/a
Default


"ShawnD2112" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Was hoping to get a bit of expertise here. I'm in the market for an
emergency bailout chute for flying in my Pitts S-1D. The top US

contenders
seem to be National and Softie but with no experience in the field,

and
parachutes not exactly being the kind of object you can try on for

size in
the shop, I don't really know what to look for and what to avoid. I'd
appreciate any tips anyone out there could provide. Are there any

European
models that anyone has any experience with? Obviously comfort and

space in
the cockpit are major considerations.

Thanks!
Shawn


Shawn;

I take it you're into negative g these days, or at least thinking about
that side of the envelope :-) I'd suggest the Mini Softie. You can get
it with a very comfortable aerobatic harness which doesn't kill you with
the metalwork if you're working the airplane negative.
It should fit into the D cockpit ok unless you've been hanging out at
Mac Donald's too much lately or into that damn "bloomin onion" thing I
ate the other night at the Outback!! Man, you should have seen THAT
thing!!!! :-)) I think they just dip it into a bucket of LDL Cholesterol
and hand it to you!! :-))
Dudley


  #5  
Old June 28th 04, 08:27 PM
m pautz
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Posts: n/a
Default



ShawnD2112 wrote:
Was hoping to get a bit of expertise here. I'm in the market for an
emergency bailout chute for flying in my Pitts S-1D. The top US contenders
seem to be National and Softie but with no experience in the field, and
parachutes not exactly being the kind of object you can try on for size in
the shop, I don't really know what to look for and what to avoid. I'd
appreciate any tips anyone out there could provide. Are there any European
models that anyone has any experience with? Obviously comfort and space in
the cockpit are major considerations.

Thanks!
Shawn


If you buy used, ask the seller for the manufacturing date. Many
riggers will not repack a canopy that is older than 20 years old. Also
check for ADs.

Butler has a very good discusion on parachute selection at:
http://www.butlerparachutes.com/howto.htm

And:
http://www.butlerparachutes.com/PDF/HowToSelect.pdf

You really need to talk to other pitts pilots. If the backpack is too
tall, it could ride up and create problems with the shoulder restraint
straps; that wouldn't be desirable when flying upside down. Here is a
quote from the Butler web page:

"In many aircraft with relatively upright seating (close to 90o, such as
the Citabria, 1-26, etc.), a backpack parachute is usually the best
choice. However, the pack must be long enough to rest on the seat bottom
and support its own weight without dragging on the shoulders of the
wearer. Conversely, it must not be so long that it rides up around the
wearerís ears and forces the shoulder restraint straps up unnecessarily.

If the pilot desires a back type parachute in an aircraft such as the
Pitts (and similar types like Great Lakes, Skybolt, etc.) with tight
cockpits, relatively upright seating and close clearance between the
pilotís face and the instrument panel, we generally recommend a back
parachute that is thickest at the bottom and thinnest at the top in
order to keep your face out of the instruments. Of course, the problem
with the thickness at the bottom is that you may begin to run out of leg
room."


For added info, do a search on "tso-c23b" or "tso-c23c"

Marty Pautz
"promote a society that respects its elders; before it is too late."

  #6  
Old June 28th 04, 08:49 PM
Dudley Henriques
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Default


"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
ink.net...

Forgot to tell you. Whatever you buy, try it on first and make at least
one flight in it with the Pitts. Don't baby the flight either. Take it
out sustained both ways and see how it feels, especially inverted. Do a
half roll, stabilize there and just hang for a bit and feel it on your
back. You'll know if it's going to do the job for you.
Dudley


  #7  
Old June 28th 04, 11:05 PM
justin
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Posts: n/a
Default

"ShawnD2112" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Was hoping to get a bit of expertise here. I'm in the market for an
emergency bailout chute for flying in my Pitts S-1D. The top US

contenders
seem to be National and Softie but with no experience in the field, and
parachutes not exactly being the kind of object you can try on for size in
the shop, I don't really know what to look for and what to avoid. I'd
appreciate any tips anyone out there could provide. Are there any

European
models that anyone has any experience with? Obviously comfort and space

in
the cockpit are major considerations.

Thanks!
Shawn


FWIW, I fly with a Softie seat parachute in my Yak. I don't have any back
room or leg room in the Yak but the seat box is deep. The seat cushion in
the plane is removable and the Softie seat parachute fits perfectly into the
seat box once the seat cushion is removed. The parachute came with a 2-inch
pad which protects the bottom of the parachute from rubbing and also
provides just the right amount of height to sit on. Real comfortable too.

Good luck

justin


  #8  
Old June 29th 04, 01:07 AM
Smutny
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Default

I highly suggest the Paraphenalia Softie with the aerobatic harness.
It gets the hardware out of the way from the restraints. Especailliy
if you put in a ratchet harnes like a Hooker.

Also, you can get the Softie with Aerobatic Harness as either a back
pack or seat pack.

-j-

On Mon, 28 Jun 2004 18:24:10 +0100, "ShawnD2112"
wrote:

Was hoping to get a bit of expertise here. I'm in the market for an
emergency bailout chute for flying in my Pitts S-1D. The top US contenders
seem to be National and Softie but with no experience in the field, and
parachutes not exactly being the kind of object you can try on for size in
the shop, I don't really know what to look for and what to avoid. I'd
appreciate any tips anyone out there could provide. Are there any European
models that anyone has any experience with? Obviously comfort and space in
the cockpit are major considerations.

Thanks!
Shawn


  #9  
Old June 29th 04, 01:11 AM
EDR
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Posts: n/a
Default


Butler will work with you on getting the fit correct.
He used to post of one of the groups, but I haven't seen anything from
him for awhile.
  #10  
Old June 29th 04, 05:29 AM
DSowder
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Posts: n/a
Default

Was hoping to get a bit of expertise here. I'm in the market for an
emergency bailout chute for flying in my Pitts S-1D. The top US contenders
seem to be National and Softie but with no experience in the field, and
parachutes not exactly being the kind of object you can try on for size in
the shop, I don't really know what to look for and what to avoid.


I'm 6 ft. and 200 lb. I used a "Mini-Softie" backpack in the S1 ("C" fuselage,
"S" wings) that I flew for several years, and was satisfied that it was the
best fit for that airplane.

When I switched to an S-2B, I bought two Wedge Softies (also backpacks), which
are thicker at the bottom than at the top. The S-2B has good legroom, the Wedge
leans me back a bit and I have more distance from face to inst. panel. Again,
the right choice; it's very comfortable, even for 10 hr. flying days.

BUT....the Wedge doesn't work for me in the S-1, because the latter is very
short on legroom. If I were 3 or 4 inches shorter, it would be a different
story, and the Wedge would be OK. It might also be OK in a "long fuselage" S-1S
or T. But I think the D is short.

Some folks like the "chair pack" which has a flap below the butt to help hold
the chute in place during negative G. I don't find any problem with the
straight backpack or the Wedge here, at least not up to -5 g's, which is about
all I ever do.

My Mini Softie had the pelvis-bruising buckles, which I thought were OK, so I
ordered the Wedge's that way. After I started flying serious advanced, the
bleeding started bothering me so at repack time, I had Dan convert my favorite
Wedge to the aerobatic harness. Problem solved.

If you can, borrow chutes from friends to try, or if you are close to a
parachute shop, fly in to visit. Dan at Paraphernalia in Arlington (WA) has
been more than accomodating to me. It's only about 220 NM from home for me, so
stopping in isn't difficult. Go to a nearby contest and you'll find 20 to 50
pilots with every conceivable type of parachute, and they'll probably all be
willing to advise and help. Especially the big ones (pilots, that is)...it's a
battle for all of us!

Doug Sowder
 




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