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Js3 jet catastrophic failure.



 
 
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  #91  
Old September 17th 18, 03:21 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dan Marotta
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Default Js3 jet catastrophic failure.

Did the exiting parts only damage the removable turtle deck?* I would
have expected them to fly in all directions radially.

On 9/17/2018 7:29 AM, wrote:
On Saturday, September 15, 2018 at 9:26:48 PM UTC-5, Mike Borgelt wrote:
The production of Halon ceased January 1, 1994, at least in the States.

Yes but it gets recovered from old equipment and can be used in fire extinguishers in certain applications.

I read a great article once about how the USAF looked into substitutes and there weren't any that did not require twice as much bulk and/or weight for same effect.

Mike

Last Friday I went out for a day of soaring. During my assembly I started both turbines for a pre-flight test. Both turbines started and had normal run ups. After tow out I was ready for takeoff. Once again the turbines started without any issues, during my takeoff roll one of the engines catastrophically failed. The rear turbine wheel exploded and shrapnel was radiated thru the exhaust cone onto my removable turtleneck. The damage to the aircraft was primarily cosmetic but the turbine is totaled.


--
Dan, 5J
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  #92  
Old September 17th 18, 03:35 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Chris Esselstyn
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Posts: 1
Default Js3 jet catastrophic failure.

On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 9:21:53 AM UTC-5, Dan Marotta wrote:
Did the exiting parts only damage the removable turtle deck?* I would
have expected them to fly in all directions radially.

On 9/17/2018 7:29 AM, wrote:
On Saturday, September 15, 2018 at 9:26:48 PM UTC-5, Mike Borgelt wrote:
The production of Halon ceased January 1, 1994, at least in the States.
Yes but it gets recovered from old equipment and can be used in fire extinguishers in certain applications.

I read a great article once about how the USAF looked into substitutes and there weren't any that did not require twice as much bulk and/or weight for same effect.

Mike

Last Friday I went out for a day of soaring. During my assembly I started both turbines for a pre-flight test. Both turbines started and had normal run ups. After tow out I was ready for takeoff. Once again the turbines started without any issues, during my takeoff roll one of the engines catastrophically failed. The rear turbine wheel exploded and shrapnel was radiated thru the exhaust cone onto my removable turtleneck. The damage to the aircraft was primarily cosmetic but the turbine is totaled.


--
Dan, 5J


The shrapnal pattern was radial. The position of the turbine wheel was aft of the trailing edge of the wing so the wings were not damaged. I found two additional small pieces in the engine bay that were lodged into the fiberglass otherwise the majority of the damage was on the aft edge of the turtle deck. There were two more marks on the fuselage right behind the turtle deck joint.



  #93  
Old September 17th 18, 03:55 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Default Js3 jet catastrophic failure.

Sounds familiar. How is the compressor wheel and blades? And also time since last service?
  #94  
Old September 17th 18, 05:32 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Jonathan St. Cloud
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Posts: 1,463
Default Js3 jet catastrophic failure.

On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 6:29:24 AM UTC-7, Chris Esselstyn wrote:
On Saturday, September 15, 2018 at 9:26:48 PM UTC-5, Mike Borgelt wrote:

The production of Halon ceased January 1, 1994, at least in the States.


Yes but it gets recovered from old equipment and can be used in fire extinguishers in certain applications.

I read a great article once about how the USAF looked into substitutes and there weren't any that did not require twice as much bulk and/or weight for same effect.

Mike


Last Friday I went out for a day of soaring. During my assembly I started both turbines for a pre-flight test. Both turbines started and had normal run ups. After tow out I was ready for takeoff. Once again the turbines started without any issues, during my takeoff roll one of the engines catastrophically failed. The rear turbine wheel exploded and shrapnel was radiated thru the exhaust cone onto my removable turtleneck. The damage to the aircraft was primarily cosmetic but the turbine is totaled.


From now on I am going to be careful where I stand when one of these is running.
  #95  
Old September 17th 18, 05:46 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Charlie M. (UH & 002 owner/pilot)
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Posts: 1,383
Default Js3 jet catastrophic failure.

Good idea. For a lot of things that rotate, especially large or fast, never good idea to "stand in the plane of rotation" about 90* to shaft axis when things are spinning.
This goes for lathes, lawnmowers, prop planes, turbines/jets, etc. When things come loose or fly off, they go out in direction of plane of rotation.
  #96  
Old September 17th 18, 05:52 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
JS[_5_]
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Posts: 624
Default Js3 jet catastrophic failure.

On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 7:55:16 AM UTC-7, wrote:
Sounds familiar. How is the compressor wheel and blades? And also time since last service?


Ouch!
A friend has several R/C models with the smaller JetCats which run 25 hours between inspections. I don't remember what is replaced at those inspections.
Jim
  #97  
Old September 17th 18, 06:28 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Frank Whiteley
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Posts: 2,099
Default Js3 jet catastrophic failure.

On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 10:47:01 AM UTC-6, Charlie M. (UH & 002 owner/pilot) wrote:
Good idea. For a lot of things that rotate, especially large or fast, never good idea to "stand in the plane of rotation" about 90* to shaft axis when things are spinning.
This goes for lathes, lawnmowers, prop planes, turbines/jets, etc. When things come loose or fly off, they go out in direction of plane of rotation.


and winch engine water pump mounted fans
  #98  
Old September 17th 18, 06:42 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Posts: 114
Default Js3 jet catastrophic failure.

A friend has several R/C models with the smaller JetCats which run 25 hours between inspections. I don't remember what is replaced at those inspections.
Jim


both bearings and sometimes the pump .. balance and test run in a chamber with ecu adjustmetns. But I would expect they also examine turbine wheel from any sign of fracture. How i am not sure.

  #99  
Old September 17th 18, 07:13 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Posts: 21
Default Js3 jet catastrophic failure.

On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 9:55:16 AM UTC-5, wrote:
Sounds familiar. How is the compressor wheel and blades? And also time since last service?


The compressor wheel is in one piece and looks to be undamaged. Further inspection most likely will show some issues. The engine was a spare that was purchased off of Ebay with only a couple of hours on it. After purchase Jet Cat USA provided some service under warranty. The engine was manufactured in 2012 but did not have allot of hours, being a spare.
  #100  
Old September 17th 18, 07:40 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
AS
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Posts: 653
Default Js3 jet catastrophic failure.

On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 1:42:12 PM UTC-4, wrote:
A friend has several R/C models with the smaller JetCats which run 25 hours between inspections. I don't remember what is replaced at those inspections.
Jim


both bearings and sometimes the pump .. balance and test run in a chamber with ecu adjustmetns. But I would expect they also examine turbine wheel from any sign of fracture. How i am not sure.


At a minimum, I would expect a Magna-Flux type dye penetrant inspection of the rotating part(s). These small turbines do not have replaceable 'blades' on a dove-tail like their full-size counterparts, so that inspection may be quite laborious to the point where sticking in a new one is more economical.

Uli
'AS'
 




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