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'Room Temperature'



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 12th 04, 08:08 AM
Anthony
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Default 'Room Temperature'

That's a valid point and room temp beer in the UK often is fresh from the
cellar where temps are certainly lower. I didn't think a still Lucas joke
would stir things up so much, I expected the Canadian hockey joke would have
gotten more attention. ;o)

tONY

"Veeduber" wrote in message
...
A recent thread on beer reminded me of my surprise when I discovered that
'warm' British beer was not warm at all. Ditto for wine in France. It

was not
'chilled' in the American sense but neither was it warm.

Why? Probably because of the difference in our definition of 'room
temperature,' with American keeping their homes quite a bit warmer than

any of
the European homes I visited. This was emphasized by watching a fellow

prepare
a European fellow mix up a batch of glue. In my own shop I keep a jug of
deionized water sitting out, to be used for mixing glue. Sitting out, the
water is at room temperature, typically around 70 or so. In Europe the

fellow
warmed the water (to about 80*F) prior to mixing, since his 'room

temperature'
was below the minimum temp recommended for resorsinol & urea-formaldehyde
glues. (Which also explains the popularity of epoxies and urethane glues,
commonly used in Europe for a generation before they caught on here in the
States.)

The whole point of this billy-dew is that 'room temperature' means

different
things to different people, 'warm' beer isn't always and there's more to

mixin'
glue than stirring it with a stick :-)

-R.S.Hoover



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  #2  
Old August 12th 04, 04:37 PM
Cy Galley
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Posts: n/a
Default

They play hockey in Canada?

"Anthony" wrote in message
...
That's a valid point and room temp beer in the UK often is fresh from the
cellar where temps are certainly lower. I didn't think a still Lucas joke
would stir things up so much, I expected the Canadian hockey joke would

have
gotten more attention. ;o)

tONY

"Veeduber" wrote in message
...
A recent thread on beer reminded me of my surprise when I discovered

that
'warm' British beer was not warm at all. Ditto for wine in France. It

was not
'chilled' in the American sense but neither was it warm.

Why? Probably because of the difference in our definition of 'room
temperature,' with American keeping their homes quite a bit warmer than

any of
the European homes I visited. This was emphasized by watching a fellow

prepare
a European fellow mix up a batch of glue. In my own shop I keep a jug

of
deionized water sitting out, to be used for mixing glue. Sitting out,

the
water is at room temperature, typically around 70 or so. In Europe the

fellow
warmed the water (to about 80*F) prior to mixing, since his 'room

temperature'
was below the minimum temp recommended for resorsinol &

urea-formaldehyde
glues. (Which also explains the popularity of epoxies and urethane

glues,
commonly used in Europe for a generation before they caught on here in

the
States.)

The whole point of this billy-dew is that 'room temperature' means

different
things to different people, 'warm' beer isn't always and there's more to

mixin'
glue than stirring it with a stick :-)

-R.S.Hoover





  #3  
Old August 12th 04, 09:16 PM
Thomas Ploch
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Default

In reality Room Temperature, as well as Warm, Cold, etc. is very well
defined. The USP, which is recognized by US Law and is consistent
with definitions around the world defines controlled Room Temperature
as 15 to 30 degrees C. You can see the other definitions he
http://www.usp.org/patientSafety/bri...94-06-01c.html
  #4  
Old August 12th 04, 09:28 PM
C.D.Damron
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Thomas Ploch" wrote in message
om...
In reality Room Temperature, as well as Warm, Cold, etc. is very well
defined. The USP, which is recognized by US Law and is consistent
with definitions around the world defines controlled Room Temperature
as 15 to 30 degrees C. You can see the other definitions he

http://www.usp.org/patientSafety/bri...Review/qr40199
4-06-01c.html

It might be a case of an unintended meaning resulting from word-by-word
translation. I have read that "room temperature", with regards to wine,
traditionally refers to the room temperature of a wine celler, with the best
temperature being about 58F.

These days, traditional wine "rules" have broken down a bit and people are
willing to experiment or follow the recomendations of the wine maker.




  #5  
Old August 12th 04, 10:33 PM
Rich S.
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Default

"Thomas Ploch" wrote in message
om...
In reality Room Temperature, as well as Warm, Cold, etc. is very well
defined. The USP, which is recognized by US Law and is consistent
with definitions around the world defines controlled Room Temperature
as 15 to 30 degrees C.


Room temperature can vary even more than that:

Room with my wife in it having a hot flash - Real Hot
Room with my wife in it when the Visa bill comes and she sees what I spent -
Piping hot
Room with my wife in it when I suggest flying to Oshkosh - Luke warm
Room with my wife in it when I come home a bit late and a few too many Moose
Drool - Chilly
Room with my wife in it when I suggest a little cuddling - Decidedly cold
Room with my wife in it when an old girlfriend calls and asks for me - Cold
enough to freeze those mythical brass balls.

Rich S.


  #6  
Old August 13th 04, 06:33 AM
Anthony
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Default


"Howard Eisenhauer" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 12 Aug 2004 07:08:53 GMT, "Anthony"
wrote:


Are the temperatures lower because they have Lucas heaters???

H.


Lucas electrics of the 1960's were known to fail frequently. Assuming this,
Lucas refrigerators wouldn't get to cold or stay cold all the time. The
joke looses a lot when you have to explain it.

Tony


  #7  
Old August 13th 04, 07:01 PM
Russell Kent
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"rip" r*nospam*[email protected]*nospam*net wrote:
Karel, you got it! "Room temperature" here in the States is 68 degrees
Fahrenheit (plus or minus 10 degrees, almost never minus).


Additional point of data: a quick survey of my office mates indicates that
75 degF +/- 3 degF is considered a "comfortable short-sleeve room
temperature". Less than 72 is slightly chilly (requires long sleeve shirt
and possibly light sweater), while more than 78 is slightly warm (requires
small fans and possibly well-chilled beverages). YMMV (and probably will).

Russell Kent


  #8  
Old August 13th 04, 07:03 PM
Russell Kent
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Default

"Howard Eisenhauer" wrote:
Are the temperatures lower because they have Lucas heaters???


"Anthony" replied:
Lucas electrics of the 1960's were known to fail frequently. Assuming

this,
Lucas refrigerators wouldn't get to cold or stay cold all the time. The
joke looses a lot when you have to explain it.


Tony,
I think Howard knew the reputation of Lucas. Re-read his (funny) comment.

Russell Kent


  #9  
Old August 14th 04, 05:56 PM
Ron Webb
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Default

I didn't think a still Lucas joke would stir things up so much

When your 'fridge doesn't work, it's human nature to convince yourself you
*LIKE* warm beer.

But go th Atlanta right now (HOT!) and work outside all day. Then go home
and sit down with 2 mugs of beer - one frosty mug at 0.1C and the other warm
and stinky at 20C. If you can choke down the warm crap first, you are one
STUBBORN fellow!

If beer isn't ICE cold, IMHO it tastes like what it looks like!
And that means ALL beer, not just the American mass produced stuff (and jes,
I know the differance).


  #10  
Old August 14th 04, 11:13 PM
bryan chaisone
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Default

My wife too, Rich.

Bryan "The Monk" Chaisone

"Rich S." wrote in message
Room temperature can vary even more than that:

Room with my wife in it having a hot flash - Real Hot
Room with my wife in it when the Visa bill comes and she sees what I spent -
Piping hot
Room with my wife in it when I suggest flying to Oshkosh - Luke warm
Room with my wife in it when I come home a bit late and a few too many Moose
Drool - Chilly
Room with my wife in it when I suggest a little cuddling - Decidedly cold
Room with my wife in it when an old girlfriend calls and asks for me - Cold
enough to freeze those mythical brass balls.

Rich S.

 




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