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Pitts questions



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 24th 03, 11:54 AM
Wendy
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Default Pitts questions

Hi-

I've a few questions concerning S1 types. The -C I know has an AEIO-320,
with ailerons on the lower wing. The -S, I believe, has an AEIO-360 along
with four ailerons. Must it also have a constant speed prop to be a true
S1S? And how does the -S differ from the -T? Lastly, can anyone enlighten
me on the differences, if any, between Aerotek and Aviat?

TIA-
Wendy


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  #2  
Old November 24th 03, 07:30 PM
Guenther Eichhorn
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Hi,

I have a list of Pitts types on-line on my aerobatics website at:

http://acro.harvard.edu/ACRO

in the section [Other Aerobatics Info].

Aerotek was the name of the company that produced the Pitts for a while. the company
changed names a few times, the current one is Aviat.

Guenther
---------------------------------------------------
Dr. Guenther Eichhorn |
ADS Project Scientist | Phone: 617-495-7260
http://ads.harvard.edu | Fax: 617-496-7700
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
1815 Mass. Ave., MS-31, Cambridge, MA 02140, USA


In article ,
"Wendy" writes:
Hi-

I've a few questions concerning S1 types. The -C I know has an AEIO-320,
with ailerons on the lower wing. The -S, I believe, has an AEIO-360 along
with four ailerons. Must it also have a constant speed prop to be a true
S1S? And how does the -S differ from the -T? Lastly, can anyone enlighten
me on the differences, if any, between Aerotek and Aviat?

TIA-
Wendy



  #3  
Old November 30th 03, 11:01 PM
Martin Morgan
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Posts: n/a
Default

As already covered the 'S' has a fixed pitch prop and the 'T' has
constant speed.

The S was also the beginning of the longer fuse.

The S started with frise ailerons and later had the symetricals which
all T's had. The T also came standard with 200hp (and electrical system)
and the top wing is further forward to handle the extra weight of the
prop and engine. There are a bunch of other little changes. Including, I
believe, an angled front on the turtle deck.

Martin Morgan


Guenther Eichhorn wrote:
Hi,

I have a list of Pitts types on-line on my aerobatics website at:

http://acro.harvard.edu/ACRO

in the section [Other Aerobatics Info].

Aerotek was the name of the company that produced the Pitts for a while. the company
changed names a few times, the current one is Aviat.

Guenther
---------------------------------------------------
Dr. Guenther Eichhorn |
ADS Project Scientist | Phone: 617-495-7260
http://ads.harvard.edu | Fax: 617-496-7700
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
1815 Mass. Ave., MS-31, Cambridge, MA 02140, USA


In article ,
"Wendy" writes:

Hi-

I've a few questions concerning S1 types. The -C I know has an AEIO-320,
with ailerons on the lower wing. The -S, I believe, has an AEIO-360 along
with four ailerons. Must it also have a constant speed prop to be a true
S1S? And how does the -S differ from the -T? Lastly, can anyone enlighten
me on the differences, if any, between Aerotek and Aviat?

TIA-
Wendy





  #4  
Old December 8th 03, 02:38 AM
Peter Ashwood-Smith C-GZRO
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Posts: n/a
Default

There are a few other differences.

The T has a pressure cowl. That is the air exits from the bottom
only. On the S, the cowl is open behind the cylinders to let air
escape.

The T does not have a bow/cutout in the upper wing above the
cockpit. Its one straight piece. Presumably this is because the wing
is further forward to help balance the engine/prop. Presumably the
fuse attach points for the lower wing are different as are the
locations of the aileron idler and bellcrank to accomadate the more
forward position. Ihave not flown an S but I imagine the visibility is
a bit better in the T due to a more forward wing.

The T ailerons have spades.

There are structural differences also. One of the easiest to see is
the cabanes. On the S's the diagaonal cabane attaches to the upper
forward vertical cabane but on the T it attaches to the rear upper
cabane. Also, the T's incorporate a solid bar between the forward and
rear cabane attach points to stop them from flexing.

There are probably a lots of other sturctural beef ups many of which
were later incorporated into uncertified S's.

Peter Ashwood-Smith

As already covered the 'S' has a fixed pitch prop and the 'T' has
constant speed.

The S was also the beginning of the longer fuse.

The S started with frise ailerons and later had the symetricals which
all T's had. The T also came standard with 200hp (and electrical system)
and the top wing is further forward to handle the extra weight of the
prop and engine. There are a bunch of other little changes. Including, I
believe, an angled front on the turtle deck.

Martin Morgan


Guenther Eichhorn wrote:
Hi,

I have a list of Pitts types on-line on my aerobatics website at:

http://acro.harvard.edu/ACRO

in the section [Other Aerobatics Info].

Aerotek was the name of the company that produced the Pitts for a while. the company
changed names a few times, the current one is Aviat.

Guenther
---------------------------------------------------
Dr. Guenther Eichhorn |
ADS Project Scientist | Phone: 617-495-7260
http://ads.harvard.edu | Fax: 617-496-7700
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
1815 Mass. Ave., MS-31, Cambridge, MA 02140, USA


In article ,
"Wendy" writes:

Hi-

I've a few questions concerning S1 types. The -C I know has an AEIO-320,
with ailerons on the lower wing. The -S, I believe, has an AEIO-360 along
with four ailerons. Must it also have a constant speed prop to be a true
S1S? And how does the -S differ from the -T? Lastly, can anyone enlighten
me on the differences, if any, between Aerotek and Aviat?

TIA-
Wendy




  #5  
Old December 8th 03, 03:33 AM
Peter Ashwood-Smith C-GZRO
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Default

This post got me curious so I took a look at the fuse diagram of the S
v.s. the T.

The cabanes have a different diagonal direction and have a solid bar
across the top.

The T has an extra (angled) bay in front of the front gear attach
hinge. On the S, the gear attaches pretty much right where the motor
mount attaches to the front of the frame. This makes the bungee
arrangment on the T totally different. Probably 'easier' to change on
a T than an S.

The T has a number of extra diagonal cross braces in the fuse. Most
notably behind/under the rear seat there are three extra braces on the
floor. Looks like they beefed it up laterally, perhaps for snaps. Also
beefier at the front with that extra diagonal bay.

Probably far more info than anybody wants or cares about but hey,
its crappy weather and looking at the diagrams beats watching T.V.

Cheers,
Peter


As already covered the 'S' has a fixed pitch prop and the 'T' has
constant speed.

The S was also the beginning of the longer fuse.

The S started with frise ailerons and later had the symetricals which
all T's had. The T also came standard with 200hp (and electrical system)
and the top wing is further forward to handle the extra weight of the
prop and engine. There are a bunch of other little changes. Including, I
believe, an angled front on the turtle deck.

Martin Morgan


Guenther Eichhorn wrote:
Hi,

I have a list of Pitts types on-line on my aerobatics website at:

http://acro.harvard.edu/ACRO

in the section [Other Aerobatics Info].

Aerotek was the name of the company that produced the Pitts for a while. the company
changed names a few times, the current one is Aviat.

Guenther
---------------------------------------------------
Dr. Guenther Eichhorn |
ADS Project Scientist | Phone: 617-495-7260
http://ads.harvard.edu | Fax: 617-496-7700
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
1815 Mass. Ave., MS-31, Cambridge, MA 02140, USA


In article ,
"Wendy" writes:

Hi-

I've a few questions concerning S1 types. The -C I know has an AEIO-320,
with ailerons on the lower wing. The -S, I believe, has an AEIO-360 along
with four ailerons. Must it also have a constant speed prop to be a true
S1S? And how does the -S differ from the -T? Lastly, can anyone enlighten
me on the differences, if any, between Aerotek and Aviat?

TIA-
Wendy




  #6  
Old December 30th 03, 10:54 PM
JERRY DEANDA
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Default

Wendy,
The S-1Cs are homebuilts and so they might have almost any engine on
them... but the original idea was for them to use the 85 hp Continental...
the 'C' was for Continental. In actual practice a LOT of these things had
125 hp Lycoming O-290Gs on them. The 'G' was for Ground Power Unit. There
were lots of these on the market, real cheap when that plan set was
released. They needed some crankshaft mods to work, and some guys sprung
for the aircraft crank, which held together much better than the modified
GPU crank. I've never seen a GPU crank on one myself... I'm pretty sure
they all got aircraft parts by now. Besides, the IAC won't allow the GPU
cranks in competition. But, remember, you could see almost any engine on
a -C, up to maybe a 200 hp Lycoming. BTW, most builders seem to have
lengthened these things a bit thru the cockpit area... they were just a bit
too tight for most folks.
The S-1S was the first type-certified Pitts. The 'S' was for symmetrical,
meaning it had symmetrical airfoils on the wings. Note that the wings had
symmetrical airfoils, but the ailerons did not have symmetrical sections...
they were the Friese type. It's fuselage was a bit longer, there are four
ailerons and the engine is the good ol' 180 hp Lycoming AEIO-360, with a
fixed metal propeller.
(a side note is in order here...The S-1E was the name the factory used on
its plans for the homebuilt -S. I believe the main difference between an -S
and an -E was the use of wood for the turtledeck and ailerons on the
homebuilt -E, metal on the factory airplanes. Of course, a homebuilder
could buy the metal parts and use them. The hangup here is, lots of those
planes that were built by homebuilders from the -E plans got registered with
the FAA as -Ss... confusing? A homebuilder can call his plane whatever he
likes, and there are a fair number of -Ss out there that are actually
homebuilts)
The S-1T was like an -S that had been lenghtened just a bit more, had
symmetrical ailerons and a 200 hp AEIO-360, with a Hartzell constant speed
propeller. The constant propeller was supposed to be used to meet noise
requirements for certification. If you're really looking at the
differences, the cabane structure was a bit different from the -S... the two
diagonals ran the other way. I think the rudder was a bit bigger.
Some folks still think the -S is the best single seat Pitts ever for it's
combination of simplicity, low weight and agility and relatively low cost.
Aviatt owns the Pitts and Husky lines these days. If I remember right,
Aerotek was the company that put the Pitts into production and did the parts
and tech support for the Pitts planes, until Frank Christen bought it.
Hmmm, that may be a bit garbled. Anybody smart on this?
I'm an old A & P that used to make my living wrenching on those funny
little dehydrated biplanes. I loved 'em and I still do.
I hope this helps, and I hope it's not too much more than you needed to
know.

Fight Gravity!

j.




"Wendy" wrote in message
...
Hi-

I've a few questions concerning S1 types. The -C I know has an AEIO-320,
with ailerons on the lower wing. The -S, I believe, has an AEIO-360 along
with four ailerons. Must it also have a constant speed prop to be a true
S1S? And how does the -S differ from the -T? Lastly, can anyone

enlighten
me on the differences, if any, between Aerotek and Aviat?

TIA-
Wendy




  #7  
Old January 2nd 04, 02:02 PM
Bushy
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I'm an old A & P that used to make my living wrenching on those funny
little dehydrated biplanes. I loved 'em and I still do.
I hope this helps, and I hope it's not too much more than you needed to
know.

Fight Gravity!

j.


Mate,
it was just what I wanted to hear. Can anything be done to make them STOL a
bit?

Or something as much fun that can STOL (1000 feet grass) and be built in the
shed?

Peter


  #8  
Old February 13th 04, 03:48 AM
Jamie
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I regularly fly my S1S, which happens to be the first certified (factory
built) Pitts, into and
out of an 1800' grass strip that a friend lives next to, and I don't use it
all.
I like it when they don't cut the grass when I land, but short grass is
better going out.

I wish I had the photo I have in my hangar to post here. It shows an F-16 in
a tractor shed
on a farm.

Anything can be STOL in the right circumstances.

Jim Klick
S1S N9JT


Mate,
it was just what I wanted to hear. Can anything be done to make them STOL

a
bit?

Or something as much fun that can STOL (1000 feet grass) and be built in

the
shed?

Peter




 




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