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Mounting a turn coordinator on the tail?



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 29th 06, 10:52 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Tim Auckland
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Mounting a turn coordinator on the tail?

(Things are so slow in this group at the moment, I thought I'd post
this to get your input on something I've been mulling over...)

If you put a plane into a skidding left turn (wings level) with left
rudder, the ball on the panel goes to the right.

However, I've been trying to work out what would happen to the ball if
it was mounted on the tail.
The rudder is pushing the tail of the plane to the right, so I think
the ball would go to the left.
Can anyone confirm this?

Tim.
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  #2  
Old July 29th 06, 11:28 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Stubby
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Posts: 117
Default Mounting a turn coordinator on the tail?

I don't think so. My understanding is the ball rests in a slightly
curved tube, arranged so that gravity tends to center it. Centrifugal
force tries to move it to the outside of the skid, up the curved tube.
Neither of these forces depends on where you mount the turn coordinator.


Tim Auckland wrote:
(Things are so slow in this group at the moment, I thought I'd post
this to get your input on something I've been mulling over...)

If you put a plane into a skidding left turn (wings level) with left
rudder, the ball on the panel goes to the right.

However, I've been trying to work out what would happen to the ball if
it was mounted on the tail.
The rudder is pushing the tail of the plane to the right, so I think
the ball would go to the left.
Can anyone confirm this?

Tim.

  #3  
Old July 30th 06, 01:43 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Tim Auckland
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Mounting a turn coordinator on the tail?

Stubby,

Thanks, I think I've got it now.

As the turn is initiated, the tail has to go right (this is what
causes the plane to turn) and my guess is that the ball initially goes
very slightly left.

However, once a constant-radius turn has been achieved, the ball will
be on the right (outside) of the turn.

Tim.

On Sat, 29 Jul 2006 18:28:28 -0400, Stubby
wrote:

I don't think so. My understanding is the ball rests in a slightly
curved tube, arranged so that gravity tends to center it. Centrifugal
force tries to move it to the outside of the skid, up the curved tube.
Neither of these forces depends on where you mount the turn coordinator.


Tim Auckland wrote:
(Things are so slow in this group at the moment, I thought I'd post
this to get your input on something I've been mulling over...)

If you put a plane into a skidding left turn (wings level) with left
rudder, the ball on the panel goes to the right.

However, I've been trying to work out what would happen to the ball if
it was mounted on the tail.
The rudder is pushing the tail of the plane to the right, so I think
the ball would go to the left.
Can anyone confirm this?

Tim.


  #4  
Old July 30th 06, 01:52 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Stubby
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 117
Default Mounting a turn coordinator on the tail?

What causes a plane to turn is the horizontal component of the lift
vector. It certainly does not depend on the turn coordinator.
What counts is the center of gravity of the plane, not the tail.



Tim Auckland wrote:
Stubby,

Thanks, I think I've got it now.

As the turn is initiated, the tail has to go right (this is what
causes the plane to turn) and my guess is that the ball initially goes
very slightly left.

However, once a constant-radius turn has been achieved, the ball will
be on the right (outside) of the turn.

Tim.

On Sat, 29 Jul 2006 18:28:28 -0400, Stubby
wrote:

I don't think so. My understanding is the ball rests in a slightly
curved tube, arranged so that gravity tends to center it. Centrifugal
force tries to move it to the outside of the skid, up the curved tube.
Neither of these forces depends on where you mount the turn coordinator.


Tim Auckland wrote:
(Things are so slow in this group at the moment, I thought I'd post
this to get your input on something I've been mulling over...)

If you put a plane into a skidding left turn (wings level) with left
rudder, the ball on the panel goes to the right.

However, I've been trying to work out what would happen to the ball if
it was mounted on the tail.
The rudder is pushing the tail of the plane to the right, so I think
the ball would go to the left.
Can anyone confirm this?

Tim.


  #5  
Old July 30th 06, 03:02 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Tim Auckland
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Mounting a turn coordinator on the tail?

I've never quite bought in to the "horizontal component of lift"
explanation for what causes a plane to turn.

I started this discussion talking about a "wings level skidding turn".
There's no horizontal component of lift generated by the wings if the
wings are level. There is however a couple comprising of the
rightwards force from the rudder, and the induced leftwards force of
wind resistance acting further forward along the fuselage. It's the
couple which causes the plane to turn.

I can also generate a substantial amount of horizontal force from the
wings without the plane turning (think forward slip); it just moves
sideways through the air.

I believe what causes a plane to turn is the couple comprised of
opposing forces which aren't aligned.

For example, in a coordinated left turn, the wings generate a
horizontal force to the left. The tail generates a horizontal force
to the right. The forces aren't aligned, so a couple is generated,
and the airplane turns left.

Without a force to the right, the "horizontal component of lift" to
the left generated by the banked wings would merely cause the plane to
move left -- it wouldn't turn.

Just my $0.10 worth, and I'll happily listen to contradictory
arguments.

Tim.

On Sat, 29 Jul 2006 20:52:00 -0400, Stubby
wrote:

What causes a plane to turn is the horizontal component of the lift
vector. It certainly does not depend on the turn coordinator.
What counts is the center of gravity of the plane, not the tail.



Tim Auckland wrote:
Stubby,

Thanks, I think I've got it now.

As the turn is initiated, the tail has to go right (this is what
causes the plane to turn) and my guess is that the ball initially goes
very slightly left.

However, once a constant-radius turn has been achieved, the ball will
be on the right (outside) of the turn.

Tim.

On Sat, 29 Jul 2006 18:28:28 -0400, Stubby
wrote:

I don't think so. My understanding is the ball rests in a slightly
curved tube, arranged so that gravity tends to center it. Centrifugal
force tries to move it to the outside of the skid, up the curved tube.
Neither of these forces depends on where you mount the turn coordinator.


Tim Auckland wrote:
(Things are so slow in this group at the moment, I thought I'd post
this to get your input on something I've been mulling over...)

If you put a plane into a skidding left turn (wings level) with left
rudder, the ball on the panel goes to the right.

However, I've been trying to work out what would happen to the ball if
it was mounted on the tail.
The rudder is pushing the tail of the plane to the right, so I think
the ball would go to the left.
Can anyone confirm this?

Tim.



  #6  
Old July 30th 06, 03:12 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Jose[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,632
Default Mounting a turn coordinator on the tail?

I started this discussion talking about a "wings level skidding turn".
There's no horizontal component of lift generated by the wings if the
wings are level. There is however a couple comprising of the
rightwards force from the rudder, and the induced leftwards force of
wind resistance acting further forward along the fuselage. It's the
couple which causes the plane to turn.


There is also the fact that the thrust vector is more aligned with the
direction of desired flight.

I believe what causes a plane to turn is the couple comprised of
opposing forces which aren't aligned.


This is always true, for any acceleration not in the direct line of
flight. There is no "one thing" which causes anything in aviation
(except at the most fundamental level, where all flight is controlled by
money). In a coordinated turn, there are several forces, as you pointed
out. However, not all turns are coordinated. What makes a car turn?
Are there analogs in aviation of these forces?

Jose
--
The monkey turns the crank and thinks he's making the music.
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  #7  
Old July 30th 06, 07:48 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Dave S
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 406
Default Mounting a turn coordinator on the tail?

Tim Auckland wrote:
(Things are so slow in this group at the moment, I thought I'd post
this to get your input on something I've been mulling over...)

If you put a plane into a skidding left turn (wings level) with left
rudder, the ball on the panel goes to the right.

However, I've been trying to work out what would happen to the ball if
it was mounted on the tail.
The rudder is pushing the tail of the plane to the right, so I think
the ball would go to the left.
Can anyone confirm this?

Tim.


If you are coordinated, the ball will be centered
If you are slipping, or skidding, the ball will be just the same as if
it was in the panel.

Dave
  #8  
Old July 30th 06, 02:17 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Jay Somerset
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40
Default Mounting a turn coordinator on the tail?

On Sat, 29 Jul 2006 15:52:39 -0600, Tim Auckland wrote:

(Things are so slow in this group at the moment, I thought I'd post
this to get your input on something I've been mulling over...)

If you put a plane into a skidding left turn (wings level) with left
rudder, the ball on the panel goes to the right.

However, I've been trying to work out what would happen to the ball if
it was mounted on the tail.
The rudder is pushing the tail of the plane to the right, so I think
the ball would go to the left.
Can anyone confirm this?

Tim.


In the situation you describe, the ball should first go to the left, as the
tail is pushed out to the right by the action of the rudder. Once the skid
is stable, and the ball will go over to the right, to reflect the fact that
the aircraft (including its tail) is turning left.
  #9  
Old July 31st 06, 12:36 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Judah
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 936
Default Mounting a turn coordinator on the tail?

Tim Auckland wrote in news:[email protected]
4ax.com:

(Things are so slow in this group at the moment, I thought I'd post
this to get your input on something I've been mulling over...)

If you put a plane into a skidding left turn (wings level) with left
rudder, the ball on the panel goes to the right.

However, I've been trying to work out what would happen to the ball if
it was mounted on the tail.
The rudder is pushing the tail of the plane to the right, so I think
the ball would go to the left.
Can anyone confirm this?

Tim.


More importantly, if you put the TC in the tail, how much rudder pressure
would the pilot have to apply in order to turn the tail quickly enough around
to see it?

I believe cats and dogs have the ability to achieve the necessary speeds,
almost even to the point that some may catch their tails in their mouths as
they look to focus on their balls. But I don't think airplanes are quite
limber enough for this capability.

  #10  
Old July 31st 06, 01:06 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Ron Natalie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,175
Default Mounting a turn coordinator on the tail?

Stubby wrote:
What causes a plane to turn is the horizontal component of the lift
vector. It certainly does not depend on the turn coordinator.
What counts is the center of gravity of the plane, not the tail.


BZZT. Incorrect over simplification and psuedoscientific drivel
given by the FAA. If you believed the FAA description, then the
airplane would just translate sidewise rather than turning in a
circle. While the horizontal component of lift is what pulls
you to the interior of the turn, the tail is VERY important to
actually "turn" the aircraft direction so that the horizontal
component continually gets pointed to the center of the turn.

 




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