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Wikipedia:Yaw string



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 29th 07, 11:08 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Doug Haluza
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Posts: 175
Default Wikipedia:Yaw string

The Wikipedia article on the yaw string is featured on the main page
today in the "Did you know...." section as follows:

"Did you know..."

....that the yaw string, a simple tuft of yarn used as a flight
instrument by the Wright brothers, is still in use today?"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yaw_string

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  #2  
Old January 29th 07, 02:32 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Posts: 57
Default Wikipedia:Yaw string

Nice work, ongoing! Doug....

These entries are surely very subtle yet powerful advertising for the
challenges of our sport.

Too bad we can't track how many people show up at a club saying... "I
was browsing this Wikipedia article and thought I'd give it a try!"

Best regards,
Bob


On Jan 29, 6:08 am, "Doug Haluza" wrote:
The Wikipedia article on the yaw string is featured on the main page
today in the "Did you know...." section as follows:

"Did you know..."

...that the yaw string, a simple tuft of yarn used as a flight
instrument by the Wright brothers, is still in use today?"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yaw_string


  #3  
Old January 29th 07, 03:17 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Tom Gardner[_1_]
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Posts: 11
Default Wikipedia:Yaw string

More surprisingly to me is the information that...

Yaw strings are also fitted to the
Lockheed U-2 high-altitude surveillance
aircraft http://www.barryschiff.com/high_flight.htm

.... but given how close U2s are to falling out the sky
at altitude (the coffin corner), perhaps it isn't too
surprising.
  #4  
Old January 29th 07, 04:21 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Jack[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 82
Default Wikipedia:Yaw string

Tom Gardner wrote:
More surprisingly to me is the information that...

Yaw strings are also fitted to the
Lockheed U-2 high-altitude surveillance
aircraft http://www.barryschiff.com/high_flight.htm

... but given how close U2s are to falling out the sky
at altitude (the coffin corner), perhaps it isn't too
surprising.



Yaw strings have also been found on USAF fighters. They aid in gunnery
training.


Jack
  #5  
Old January 29th 07, 04:21 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Wayne Paul
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Posts: 905
Default Wikipedia:Yaw string

They was also a provisions for a yaw string on the F-4 Phantom.

Wayne
http://www.soaridaho.com/


"Tom Gardner" wrote in message
43.37...
More surprisingly to me is the information that...

Yaw strings are also fitted to the
Lockheed U-2 high-altitude surveillance
aircraft http://www.barryschiff.com/high_flight.htm

... but given how close U2s are to falling out the sky
at altitude (the coffin corner), perhaps it isn't too
surprising.



  #6  
Old January 29th 07, 04:45 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Ralph Jones
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Posts: 20
Default Wikipedia:Yaw string

On 29 Jan 2007 03:08:22 -0800, "Doug Haluza"
wrote:

The Wikipedia article on the yaw string is featured on the main page
today in the "Did you know...." section as follows:

"Did you know..."

...that the yaw string, a simple tuft of yarn used as a flight
instrument by the Wright brothers, is still in use today?"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yaw_string


Hm...didn't point out the importance of using a metric yaw string on
German sailplanes...;-)

rj
  #7  
Old January 29th 07, 05:00 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
bumper
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Posts: 322
Default Wikipedia:Yaw string

Nor did they mention the vastly improved yaw string, the MKII "high tech"
yaw string! The MKII is reputed, by generally refutable and unreliable
sources, to increase L/D by at least 2 points - - but who's counting. This
from the inventor of the "QV quiet vent kit" (which really does decrease
noise from the Mecaplex flip-out window vent by a full 10 db as measured in
an ASH26E at 60 knots). Contact me directly for more info.

I'll have a supply of both with me at the SSA convention.

bumper ZZ (reverse all after @)
"Dare to be different . . . circle in sink."


"Ralph Jones" wrote in message
...
On 29 Jan 2007 03:08:22 -0800, "Doug Haluza"
wrote:

The Wikipedia article on the yaw string is featured on the main page
today in the "Did you know...." section as follows:

"Did you know..."

...that the yaw string, a simple tuft of yarn used as a flight
instrument by the Wright brothers, is still in use today?"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yaw_string


Hm...didn't point out the importance of using a metric yaw string on
German sailplanes...;-)

rj



  #8  
Old January 29th 07, 07:30 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Nyal Williams
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 215
Default Wikipedia:Yaw string

Some of us are waiting with abated breath (nothing
fishy here) for the Mark III calibrated model. It
is reported to have a transparent sweep screen underneath
it so as to measure the precise angle of slip and aid
in selecting the amount of rudder input required.

At 17:06 29 January 2007, Bumper wrote:
Nor did they mention the vastly improved yaw string,
the MKII 'high tech'
yaw string! The MKII is reputed, by generally refutable
and unreliable
sources, to increase L/D by at least 2 points - - but
who's counting. This
from the inventor of the 'QV quiet vent kit' (which
really does decrease
noise from the Mecaplex flip-out window vent by a full
10 db as measured in
an ASH26E at 60 knots). Contact me directly for more
info.

I'll have a supply of both with me at the SSA convention.

bumper ZZ
'Dare to be different . . . circle in sink.'


'Ralph Jones' wrote in message
.. .
On 29 Jan 2007 03:08:22 -0800, 'Doug Haluza'
wrote:

The Wikipedia article on the yaw string is featured
on the main page
today in the 'Did you know....' section as follows:

'Did you know...'

...that the yaw string, a simple tuft of yarn used
as a flight
instrument by the Wright brothers, is still in use
today?'

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yaw_string


Hm...didn't point out the importance of using a metric
yaw string on
German sailplanes...;-)

rj







  #9  
Old January 29th 07, 08:50 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
bumper
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 322
Default Wikipedia:Yaw string

Nyal,

I love a challenge(g).

However, including a sweep screen with photo-optical sensor to provide data
to a remote digital angle-of-slip indicator, would cause a bodacious
increase in the $9 selling price.

We could go low tech though. Since the MKII yaw string already comes with
transparent turbulator base and a single light colored alignment dot*, it
wouldn't be that much trouble to include two additional alignment dots and a
template to install them at say, 10 degrees each side of center.

*The center alignment dot, affixed to the inside of the canopy surface, is
light colored so it doesn't tend to attract the eye, tricking it into
thinking it's outside traffic, as would a dark colored dot.

As an aside, I've seen several MKII yaw string installations where the pilot
chose not to install the included alignment dot as all. So clearly all this
is a matter of preference . . . as is the decision to continue using that
ugly old tape and yarn!!.
--
bumper ZZ (reverse all after @)
"Dare to be different . . . circle in sink."

"Nyal Williams" wrote in message
...
Some of us are waiting with abated breath (nothing
fishy here) for the Mark III calibrated model. It
is reported to have a transparent sweep screen underneath
it so as to measure the precise angle of slip and aid
in selecting the amount of rudder input required.

At 17:06 29 January 2007, Bumper wrote:
Nor did they mention the vastly improved yaw string,
the MKII 'high tech'
yaw string! The MKII is reputed, by generally refutable
and unreliable
sources, to increase L/D by at least 2 points - - but
who's counting. This
from the inventor of the 'QV quiet vent kit' (which
really does decrease
noise from the Mecaplex flip-out window vent by a full
10 db as measured in
an ASH26E at 60 knots). Contact me directly for more
info.

I'll have a supply of both with me at the SSA convention.

bumper ZZ
'Dare to be different . . . circle in sink.'


'Ralph Jones' wrote in message
. ..
On 29 Jan 2007 03:08:22 -0800, 'Doug Haluza'
wrote:

The Wikipedia article on the yaw string is featured
on the main page
today in the 'Did you know....' section as follows:

'Did you know...'

...that the yaw string, a simple tuft of yarn used
as a flight
instrument by the Wright brothers, is still in use
today?'

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yaw_string

Hm...didn't point out the importance of using a metric
yaw string on
German sailplanes...;-)

rj









  #10  
Old January 29th 07, 10:15 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
kirk.stant
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,260
Default Wikipedia:Yaw string

Darn things work even better when you tape both ends down. Just have
to make sure it's on straight first...

And they last longer on the inside of the canopy, anyway.

66


 




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